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30 AFRICA FOCUS


a higher number of cycles before the point of breakage, therefore implying that the hair is stronger. Hair tresses were treated with a placebo conditioner or a conditioner containing the the vegetable protein blend at 1% active use level (see Table 2 for the formulation). Figure 2 and Figure 3 show respectively


the Median and Characteristic Life obtained after one application of the conditioners. The number of cycles to break have increased for hair treated with the vegetable protein blend compared to the placebo conditioner, indicating that the hair fibres have become more resilient from a single application. The survival probability of hair treated with


the vegetable protein blend is also generally higher than the placebo conditioner after one application as seen on Figure 4. A higher survival probability suggests a higher number of cycles before the point of breakage, indicating that the hair fibres are stronger. The same parameters were measured


after 5 applications. A significant increase was observed in the characteristic life, median values and survival probability, demonstrating that hair fibre strength is further improved following repeated applications with the vegetable protein blend. Data generated allow us to show the


inclusive efficacy of our vegan alternative to animal-derived keratin on European, Asian and African-textured hair. From one of the consumer groups engaged by Croda South Africa, anti-breakage and strengthening claims came as the major needs for this market, therefore, KeraMatch V, through its multi- ethnicity performance, appears to be an ideal solution. The recent negative perception around the use of proteins on Afro-textured hair and their tendency to cause build-up led us however to question it and encouraged us to go further and demonstrate hair integrity remain the same after being treated. The effect of the vegetable protein blend


on Type VII Afro-textured hair has been evaluated using tensile testing on hair treated with a neat protein solution and at 1% active in a conditioner formulation. Two parameters were measured to assess the impact on hair treated with the vegetable protein blend Cross-sectional Area and Elastic Modulus. Cross-sectional Area is an indication of the size of the hair fibre. If an increase is observed, this could indicate protein build-up on the hair fibre. Elastic Modulus is related to hair stiffness; a sharp increase in this parameter could result in stiff, brittle hair fibres with poor mechanical properties. As can be seen in Figure 5, the cross- sectional area of hair fibres does not increase after repeated conditioner applications or with the use of the neat protein solution both containing the vegetable protein blend compared to the placebo treatments. This suggests that protein build-up did not occur after repeated applications. The elastic modulus results give another


indication (Fig 6). While hair treated with the neat protein solution containing the vegetable


PERSONAL CARE July 2021


1 conditioner application - Placebo ■


1 conditioner application - KeraMatch V■ 5 conditioner applications - Placebo■


16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0


Treatment Figure 5: The Cross-sectional Area of hair fibres from various treatments. 1 conditioner application - Placebo ■


1 conditioner application - KeraMatch V■ 5 conditioner applications - Placebo■


0.06E+09 0.05E+09 0.04E+09 0.03E+09 0.02E+09 0.01E+09


0.00E+09 Treatment Figure 6: The Elastic Modulus of hair fibres from various treatments.


protein blend show no significant change in elastic modulus compared to the placebo, it does present a reduction following repeated conditioner applications with the vegetable protein blend compared to the placebo, suggesting that the hair does not become stiff.


Conclusion Overall, studies confirm that not only does KeraMatch V have strengthening benefits on Afro-textured hair but that is also does not have a detrimental impact on the fibre in terms of protein build-up, either from repeated conditioner applications or from a neat protein solution. Hair products mentioning “textured” on


pack have seen an increase in recent years but there is still a gap in the market for mainstream products that target consumers with Afro-textured hair. There is a real


urge to develop more multicultural hair care products, and this requires a better knowledge of their hair characteristics and needs. Croda’s novel protein, KeraMatch V, is a good example of inclusivity. It comes to meet consumers’ expectations by offering hair strengthening to three different hair types without impacting hair integrity and feel, even Afro-textured hair known to be more prone to build-up.


References 1. Bhushan B. Nanoscale characterisation of human hair and hair conditioners. Progress in Materials Science 2008; 53(4): 585-710.


2. De La Mettrie R, Saint-Léger D, Loussouarn G, Garcel A, Porter C, Langaney A. Shape Variability and Classification of Human Hair: A Worldwide Approach. Human Biology 2007 ; 79(3) : 265-281.


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5 conditioner applications - KeraMatch V■ Neat sollution - Placebo■ Neat sollution - KeraMatch V■


5 conditioner applications - KeraMatch V■ Neat sollution - Placebo■ Neat solution - KeraMatch V■


PC


Elastic Modulus (Pascals) Cross-sectional Area (sq micron)


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