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The Midlands


Birmingham office market ends year with a bang - LSH


Birmingham’s office market ended 2018 with a bang, recording 278,000 sq ft of deals in Q4, according to national commercial property consultancy Lambert Smith Hampton (LSH).


The latest LSH Office Market Pulse reports that Q4 was by far the best quarter of the year for office deals in the resurgent second city.


Alex Cross of Lambert Smith Hampton


A significant contributor to the Q4 total was the deal in which Birmingham City University took 118,000 sq ft of space at Eastside Locks.


Alex Tross, head of office advisory at LSH in Birmingham, said: “This year, the key scheme to reach practical completion is 3 Snow Hill, bringing 420,000 sq ft of Grade A space to the market. There appears to be interest from both inward investors and local occupiers, which is a good sign in spite of the wider economic uncertainty.


“There also continues to be significant interest from the serviced office sector, with We Work rumoured to be close to confirming they are taking significant space in the city.”


Two join Knight Frank Building Consultancy team in Birmingham


Helen Cooper


Knight Frank has strengthened its Midlands Building Consultancy team with the appointment of Helen Cooper as Associate, and Stephanie Poppitt as Graduate Surveyor in the Birmingham office. Helen joins from Baily Garner in Birmingham where she was a principal surveyor. She said: “My role in the firm’s


Building Consultancy team will be to provide building surveying services including on dilapidations matters, acquisition surveys, party wall matters and a range of construction project work.”


Drew Watkins, Partner in Knight Frank’s Building Consultancy division in Birmingham, said: “We are delighted to welcome Helen to our team. Her appointment enables us to provide continued personable service to our existing clients and also strengthens our team’s drive to secure new clients.”


Knight Frank’s Building Consultancy division works with developers, investors, landlords, funds and tenants to provide a wide range of professional building surveying related services associated with the practical aspects of owning, leasing, maintaining, developing and investing in commercial property across a building’s life cycle. Nationally, the team comprises over 50 chartered building surveyors and project managers operating across all commercial property sectors including offices, industrial, hotels, healthcare, retail, education, student property and institutional properties.


18


Motorway Junctions Are Key to Solving Worcestershire’s Business Property Shortage


Land around Worcestershire’s six motorway junctions should be allocated exclusively for employment usage to address the county’s shortage of business premises and prevent employers re-locating elsewhere, according to one of Worcestershire’s leading commercial property agents.


Addressing an audience of more than 200 business leaders at Worcestershire LEP’s (WLEP) annual conference, John Dillon, Managing Director of Worcestershire commercial property consultancy and Chartered Surveyors GJS Dillon, said that the shortage of warehouses, industrial units and offices in Worcestershire is most acute for micro and small enterprises which make up more than 97% of the county’s businesses. The solution, according to Mr Dillon, who is working collaboratively with WLEP, Worcestershire County Council, landowners, developers and fellow commercial property agents to address the issue, is for Worcestershire’s District Councils to allocate land around Junctions 4 to 7 of the M5 and around Junctions 1 and 2 of the M42 for small industrial and warehouse units and offices in their Local Development Plans


Unanimous green light for Barberry’s £6m warehouse


Leading commercial property developer Barberry Developments has gained planning consent to deliver a 55,575 sq ft speculatively built industrial/warehouse unit in Wolverhampton. The development will be a highly specified Grade A building with 10-metre eaves, 2,965 sq ft of internal offices, 45


car parking spaces and 50-metre yard depths, with dock and level access loading provision.


Barberry Developments’ planning application was approved unanimously by the City of Wolverhampton Council’s planning committee. Construction could begin in Q2 2019 with practical completion in Q4 2019 The scheme, at Well Lane, demonstrates Barberry Developments’ continued investment in the region.


Jon Robinson, development director at West Midlands-based Barberry Developments, said: “We are excited about creating a new, high quality industrial and logistics development in Wolverhampton. Our Well Lane scheme complements other projects we have delivered within the region where we have created best in class, Grade A buildings. Our investment within Wolverhampton will generate around 120 jobs, making a significant contribution to the local economy.”


The site is situated in a prime location just four miles from J10 of the M6 via the A454, within 3.4 miles from J1 of the M54. It also benefits from its close proximity to links to the M6 Toll, M5, and M42. It is adjacent to the Sainsbury’s supermarket in Wednesfield Way, with Bentley Bridge Retail Park nearby hosting a number of market leading shops and restaurants. Other major occupiers nearby include Yodel, Euro Car Parts, Travis Perkins, Mercedes, Tool Station and Tata Steel. Jaguar Land Rover has an engine factory within five miles at i54.


For all enquiries please contact Barberry 55’s retained agents JLL and GVA/Avison Young


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MONTHLY 2019


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