search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
The Midlands


Birmingham Industrial Rents Rise By 25% In Past Five Years Some Landlords Seeking Higher Increases


Increased demand for industrial and manufacturing space, coupled with the loss of many acres of industrial land due to HS2, has seen an increase in Birmingham industrial rents of between 20% and 25% over the past five years, according to Birmingham independent commercial property agency KWB.


But KWB Head of Valuation and RICS registered valuer, Martin Cook warns that some landlords are seeking to exploit the industrial space shortage by asking for rental increases in excess of 40% at rent reviews.


“Depending on the age and type of industrial unit, the average rent of a Birmingham industrial unit has risen between 20% and 25% over the past five years to £6.50 to £7psf,” says Mr Cook. “The uplift is similar around Solihull, but average rents are higher there at around £8.50psf.


“However some landlords are trying to push the rental market higher on the back of the shortage of industrial space at the five year rent reviews, or in negotiations for a new lease when the tenant wishes to remain in


Buccleuch Property Invests Over £2M In Walsall


Buccleuch Property has recently invested over £2m in the purchase and refurbishment of two high spec industrial units at Bescot Point, Walsall. Following the purchase of the property in August 2017, the commercial property specialist has enhanced existing facilities to provide prime space for businesses looking to relocate within the area.


Spanning 52,142 sq ft in total, the units have been overclad and extensively modernised, ready for new tenants.Currently available to rent, Unit 2 covers 28,169 sq ft, and comprises two storey office and 15,690 sq ft of industrial space. Benefitting from 60 car parking spaces, the facility has four level access roller shutter loading doors, a yard and 5.6m eaves.


Encompassing 23,973 sq ft, Unit 1 has already been let to Zero 1 Exhibitions Limited, who signed a 15-year lease on the property.


16


occupation under the 1954 Landlord and Tenant Act.


“This seems to be more prevalent in North Birmingham where the demands of HS2 have seen swathes of industrial land compulsorily purchased and a number of occupiers having to seek new premises.”


“I have been negotiating new rental terms for industrial and manufacturing units on behalf of a number of tenants in the Aston and Perry Barr areas, where one landlord started off by asking for an increase of some 42%.


“I negotiated this down to an agreement at some 22% increase, but it is vital that tenants are represented by expert valuers in this rent negotiation process, otherwise they could end up paying well in excess of the current market rate.”


Further information about how KWB can help occupiers with lease events is available from Martin Cook on tel. 0121 233 2330 or via https://kwboffice.com/property- services/occupiers/rent-reviews-and- lease-renewals/


Blue Marble Acquires Solihull Office Investment For £6.1 Million


Blue Marble Asset Management (Blue Marble) has recently acquired a 31,000 sq ft office building with development land in Solihull.


Acting on behalf of Wyre Forest District Council (WFDC), Edward Jones, Investment Director at Birmingham-based real estate asset management company Blue Marble, acquired the freehold of Stratford Court, Cranmore Boulevard, Solihull, B90 4QT for £6.1 million. Blue Marble and WFDC were advised by the Birmingham office of Savills. Lewis Ellis advised the vendor.


Stratford Court is a multi-let office building providing 30,694 sq ft of open plan accommodation over three floors, let to six tenants, located on Cranmore Boulevard close to Stratford Road, one of the main arterial routes into Birmingham city centre. There is also an expired planning consent to build two office buildings, totalling 19,911 sq ft, on the site.


Knight Frank PAM team wins Warwick Technology Park contract


three principal tenants - Delphi Diesel Systems, Baker Hicks and Accenture.


David Charlton, partner in Knight Frank’s Birmingham PAM team, said:


“Our Midlands PAM team has won five new contracts in the past six months, all of which are regional instructions.”


Birmingham, UK – Commercial property consultancy Knight Frank has won the contract to provide property management services at the One Warwick Technology Park office building. Knight Frank’s Midlands Property Asset Management team will provide day-to-day property management, facilities management and rent and service charge collection at the 49,157 sq ft multi-let headquarters-style building. The office is located on the 70 acre Warwick Technology Park, near Junctions 13, 14 and 15 of the M40 motorway, and was recently comprehensively refurbished to provide Grade A office accommodation over ground and two upper floors. The building is fully let to


Knight Frank’s Property Asset Management division provides a range of management services for landlords, including managing rents and arrears, service charges, facilities management and tenant liaison. Knight Frank has invested heavily in specialist computer systems to enable commercial property owners to see all aspects of their buildings’ property and financial performance at the click of a button.


David Charlton added: “We can work with clients to provide a tailored, adaptable service to their asset management needs.”


Knight Frank’s PAM division won the Agency Team of the Year award for 2018 from leading national magazine Property Week.


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MONTHLY 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68