search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Company insight


Astaxanthin and the immune system


The global population is becoming increasingly health-conscious as a result of Covid-19, with the immune system taking centre stage. BDI-BioLife Science reveals how the most powerful, naturally occurring antioxidant, astaxanthin, boasts a number of health benefits and scavenges free radicals to boost and protect the immune system.


F


or more than a year, the Covid-19 pandemic has been demonstrating the negative sides of globalisation. In no time at all, the deadly virus spread across the globe, infecting millions of people, causing hundreds of thousands of deaths and pushed health systems, and the global economy, to their limits. Despite medical advances and the rapid development of vaccines, this small virus continues to rage.


Citizens around the world are hoping that the rapid vaccination roll-out will allow normality to resume. Within these hopes of eating out, enjoying concerts, going to museums, travelling and celebrating events, lies the reality that our health is a precious commodity.


Understanding immunity To truly understand health is to understand the complexity of the human immune system. This highly complex and sensitive network is distributed in and around the entire organism – organs such as bone marrow, thymus, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes are just as much a part of it as special blood cells and the intestinal tract, which is home to around 70% of our immune cells. Without an immune system, the body would be defenceless against both harmful environmental influences and health-damaging changes within. The immune system is divided into the innate (non-specific) immune system and the acquired (specific) immune system. Both defence systems are closely interconnected and complement each other in every reaction against a pathogen or harmful substance. In doing so, they take on different tasks.


22


The microalgae haematococcus pluvialis produces the red pigment astaxanthin in stress situations for its own protection.


The innate immune system fends off pathogens in general (non-specific). It works primarily with immune cells, such as the ‘scavenger cells’ or ‘killer cells’, which are specialised in recognising virus-infected and tumour-like body cells and dissolving them with the help of cell toxins (cytotoxins). If the innate immune system does not succeed in destroying the pathogens, the acquired immune system takes over, which includes the following elements: T-lymphocytes in the tissue between the body cells; B-lymphocytes, also in the tissue between the body cells and antibodies in the blood; and other body fluids. The acquired immune system targets (specifically) the pathogen that causes the infection. Although the


specific immune system takes a little longer to recognise the pathogen, the invader is fought with great accuracy and rendered harmless. Another advantage of the specific immune system is that it can remember the attacker.


Thus, the defence reaction sets in more quickly in the event of renewed contact with a pathogen that is already known. This defence memory is the reason why some diseases are only contracted once in a lifetime or why immunity is granted after overcoming an infection. The effect is exploited, among other things, in immunisation through vaccination. Since the specific defence system is always adapting, the body also manages to fight bacteria and viruses that change over time.


Ingredients Insight / www.ingredients-insight.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96