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52 New Year, New You Innovative healthcare & specialist clinics


Promotional Content • Saturday 9th January 2021


Spinal surgery, the NHS, the pandemic and beyond


Mr Dimpu Bhagawati discusses how best to prevent paralysis during the pandemic T


he past year has been a severe test


for the whole country. Fifty-thousand souls no longer


with us, countless lives marred by a virus whose simplicity was mirrored only by its lethality. Despite colleagues lost, we pressed


on to resume urgent planned surgery. During the first part of the lockdown, the mountain of patients waiting grew almost insurmountable. But as the restrictions started to ease we pressed forward, knowing that the second wave would come. In my NHS trust we reached nearly 100% of normal capacity by September and beyond this by October. We’ve had to make very difficult decisions about priority, knowing that patients would deterio- rate — some irreversibly.


A thank you We in the NHS are very grateful to the hard work of the whole nation. Te sacrifices made during lockdown I and lockdown II have limited coronavirus to a crisis rather than a catastrophe. As we look forward to a new year, to a vaccine and return to new normality, we look forward to a new you.


New year and new you Anecdotally, there’s been a rise in spinal


problems during the lock- down. More sedentary lifestyles,


time away from work and reduced activity have led to an increase in spinal problems.


Non-medical before medical Make time for activities such as walking and flexibility exercises such as yoga. Exercises like pelvic tilt, knee-to-chest and lower-trunk rota- tion can help to control symptoms has part of a structured programme.


No surgical before surgical When self-directed regimes fail, try to engage an appropriate physical ther- apist — physiotherapist, osteopath or chiropractor. Tese can all help you structure a tailored plan for you hectic lifestyles.


Less-invasive surgery Most surgical procedures aren’t designed for rapid recovery and early return to function. Te vast majority of our


procedures are carried out


as day case interventions designed to allow you to return to your desired level of activity within a very short time. Even for more major surgeries, patients


can mobilise immediately


after the operation, often in little or no discomfort.


Seek appropriate advice Your GP will be very experienced in dealing with spinal problems. He or she will be best placed to direct you through self-help, non-operative ther- apies and through to surgery.


For further information on common spinal condition, please visit bhagawatispineclinic.co.uk or dbspine.co.uk T: 0845 163 4450 E: info@dbspine.co.uk


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