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Groups and Single Decorations for Gallantry 76


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A Second War ‘Hazebrouck 1940’ M.M. group of five awarded to Warrant Officer Class III J. H. Miller, Buckinghamshire Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Military Medal, G.VI.R. (5379962 W.O. Cl.3. J. H. Miller. Oxf. & Bucks. L.I.); 1939-45 Star; Defence and War Medals 1939-45; Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., 1st issue, Territorial (5379962 W.O. Cl.III. J. H Miller. 1-Bucks Bn. Oxf & Bucks. L. I.) good very fine


Three: Sergeant J. H. Miller, Army Cyclist Corps, later Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1914-15 Star (600 Sjt. J. H. Miller. A. Cyc. Corps.); British War Medal 1914-20 (33860 Sjt. J. H. Miller. L.N. Lan. R.); Victory Medal 1914-19, erased; some staining to Star, otherwise generally very fine (8)


£800-£1,200


M.M. London Gazette 25 October 1945: ‘For gallant and distinguished services in the Field.’


5379962 Warrant Officer Class III John Henry Miller was born in 1913 and attested for the Buckinghamshire Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (Territorial Force). He served with them during the Second World War, and was awarded the Military Medal for his gallantey at Hazebrouck, France ,in May 1940 (The Bucks Herald, 3 November 1945 refers).


600 Sergeant John Henry Miller, the father of the above, initially served with the Army Cyclist Corps during the Great War on the Western Front from 31 March 1915. Transferring to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment on 22 July 1916, he was wounded in December 1917, and was discharged on 22 November 1918.


77


A Second War 1944 ‘Gothic Line’ operations M.M. awarded Havildar Sher Mohd, 1st Battalion, 2nd Punjab Regiment, for his gallantry in leading a storming party against a fortified house, and for effecting the eventual capture of the remaining eight defenders


Military Medal, G.VI.R. (12111 Hav. Sher Mohd 2 Punjab. R.) contact mark in obverse field, otherwise good very fine £500-£700


M.M. London Gazette 8 March 1945, the original recommendation (for an I.D.S.M.) states:


‘On the night of 3/4 Oct. during the S. Donato action, 0490, a very strongly fortified enemy post in a house resisted many attempts to capture it for over an hour. This very gallant N.C.O. volunteered to lead another close quarter attack on the house despite the fact that seven casualties had already been taken and that PIAT bombs and grenades had failed to discourage the defenders. Hav. Sher Mohd organised and led the final attack, forced an entry and received the surrender of the remaining eight defenders. There is no doubt that the splendid inspiring leadership and personal gallantry of this N.C.O. was responsible for the surrender of this stout hearted garrison.’


78


A Second War ‘Burma operations’ M.M. group of five awarded to Naik Mohammd Ashraf Khan, 3rd Bombay Grenadiers, Indian Army


Military Medal, G.VI.R. (11459 Naik Mohd Ashraf Ind Gdrs.); 1939-45 Star; Burma Star; Defence and War Medals 1939 -45, the MM polished and worn, and the campaign medals somewhat corroded, therefore generally good fine (5)


£400-£500 M.M. London Gazette 17 January 1946: ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Burma.’


The original Recommendation, dated 15 May 1945, states: ‘This N.C.O. during the whole campaign has been a constant source of inspiration to his comrades in his company and his bravery and dash have been the subject of conversation amongst the tank crews. On 8 March 1945 Naik Mohammed Ashraf Khan was commanding his section which was acting as tank escort to a Troop of “A” Squadron who were supporting the Royal Berkshires. The leading infantry and the tanks came under heavy fire from guns, mortars, and light automatics and were forced to withdraw. Naik Mohammed Ashraf Khan seeing that some wounded had been left behind, called to some British Other Ranks to help him recover them. These men failed to understand, so the Naik entirely on his own initiative went forward alone under heavy fire and carried one of the wounded men back to safety He then went forward again alone and under heavy fire and brought back another British Other Rank. By this Naik’s courageous action, the lives of these two men were saved and his coolness and devotion to duty under heavy fire were of the highest order. Such action has been typical of his conduct throughout the campaign. His disregard for his personal safety, devotion to duty, and determination to close with the enemy have been of the highest standard and he has proved himself a first class leader in a Company which has done extremely well throughout. His conduct has gained the admiration of the men in my regiment.’


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