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Miniature Medals 637


The mounted group of eight miniature dress medals attributed to Major-General C. J. Wallace, C.B., Highland Light Infantry


Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar, reverse central medallion missing; The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, O.B.E. (Military) Officer’s 1st type badge, silver-gilt, on 2nd type Military riband, gilding almost all rubbed from obverse; Military Cross, G.V.R.; 1914 Star; British War and Victory Medals, with M.I.D. oak leaves; Coronation 1937; France, Third Republic, Croix de Guerre, bronze, reverse dated ‘1914-1918’, with bronze palm emblem on riband, mounted as worn and housed in a Garrard, London fitted case, good very fine (8)


£200-£240


D.S.O. London Gazette 1 January 1918. O.B.E. London Gazette 1 January 1919. M.C. London Gazette 23 June 1915. French Croix de Guerre London Gazette 14 July 1919.


Charles John Wallace was born on 6 February 1890, the son of Lieutenant-Colonel H. R. Wallace, and was educated at Charterhouse. Commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Highland Light Infantry on 5 October 1910, he was promoted Lieutenant on 19 March 1913, and served with the 2nd Battalion during the Great War on the Western Front from August 1914, being present during the operations at Mons and at the Battle of Loos. Promoted Captain on 17 May 1915, he subsequently served as Brigade Major of the 68th Brigade, and was promoted Brevet Major on 1 January 1917, at the early age of just 26. For his services during the Great War he was awarded the D. S.O., O.B.E., and M.C., as well as the French Croix de Guerre, and was Mentioned in Despatches five times (London Gazettes 22 June 1915, 1 January 1916, 4 January 1917, 11 December 1917, and 20 December 1918).


Post-War, Wallace was nominated for the Staff College, and served as Adjutant of the 1st Battalion in Egypt. Further appointments included Assistant Adjutant and Quarter Master General of the 1st Division at Aldershot from 1935-38, and Commander of the 3rd (Jhelum) Infantry Brigade in India from 1939. Advanced Major-General, he served as Aide-de-Camp to H.M. the King from 1938-40, and was created a Companion of the Order of the Bath in the 1941 New Year’s Honours’ List (London Gazette 1 January 1941). He died on 20 December 1943.


Sold together with the recipient’s riband bar for the first four awards.


638


An unattributed Great War D.S.O. group of three miniature dress medals


Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., gold and enamel, with integral top gold riband bar; 1914-15 Star; British War Medal 1914-20, mounted as worn together with the riband for the Victory Medal, ands housed in a Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co. Ltd., London, fitted leather case, about extremely fine (3)


£70-£90


639


An ‘Arctic Medal’ group of three miniature dress medals possibly worn by Sir Richard V. Hamilton, Royal Navy


Baltic 1854-55; China 1857-60, 1 clasp, Fatshan 1857; Arctic Medal 1818-55, mounted as worn, brooch bar with gold pin, and housed in a fitted Garrard, London, case, last with contact marks, nearly very fine and better (3) £300-£400


Provenance: Dix Noonan Webb, March 2014.


Sold with copied research which indicates that only four men, all naval officers, received this combination of medals (two of whom died in 1860, before the China Medal was authorised). Of the four, this group is possibly attributed to Admiral Sir Richard Vesey Hamilton, K.C.B., Royal Navy.


Sir Richard Vesey Hamilton was born at Sandwich, Kent, and attended the Naval School at Camberwell. He entered the Navy in 1843, in the Vigaro (Mediterranean), and continued to serve at that station until he passed for a Mate. He served as Mate in the Assistance under Ommanney, 1850-51. During the expedition he led one of the auxiliary sledge parties in 1851, and during the journey he searched Lowther and Young Islands, being away from the ship for 28 days travelling over 198 miles with Osborn. Advanced Lieutenant in the Resolute under Kellet, 1852-54, in the autumn of 1852 he travelled over 168 miles and was away from the ship 16 days; during 1853 he travelled over 675 miles by sledge and was away from the ship for 54 days; and in the winter of 1853-54 he installed an electric telegraph between the Resolute and Intrepid.


In 1855 Hamilton was appointed First Lieutenant of the Desperate in the Baltic; and in 1856 he commanded the gun-boat Haughty in China at the battle of Fatshan. Promoted to Commander in 1856 and Captain in 1862, he commanded the Steam Reserve at Devonport during 1873-74, and was appointed Captain Superintendent of Pembroke Dockyard in January 1874.


www.dnw.co.uk all lots are illustrated on our website and are subject to buyers’ premium at 24% (+VAT where applicable)


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