search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Groups and Single Decorations for Gallantry


In November 1922 Harrison joined the cruiser H.M.S. Curlew as First Lieutenant and Gunnery Officer, on the North America and West Indies station. He then proceeded to the Pacific and was employed as guard ship at the Eagle Oil (Aguila) refinery in Southern Mexico, up to the Coatzcoalcos River, to prevent interference in the refinery by the combatants in the Mexican Civil War. In August 1925, he joined H.M.S. Valiant, in the Mediterranean as First Gunnery Officer. Promoted to Commander in August 1926, he left H.M.S. Valiant and joined the Admiralty (Operations Division). His next Sea appointment was in H.M.S. Calcutta as Commander, the Flagship of Africa station, from June 1928. In 1931 he joined H.M.S. Vivid as Drafting Commander, and then H.M.S. Montrose, in command of Reserve Destroyers, in 1934. Promoted to Captain, he retired the following year, being appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 1935 New Year’s Honours’ List.


Harrison was recalled from the Reserve in June 1939 and appointed Chief of Staff Africa Squadron in H.M.S. Neptune. On declaration of War the Africa Squadron was split up and ships took station in various patrol areas. The Commander in Chief and Staff landed and took over in Sierra Leone where Harrison became ‘Naval Officer in Charge’ and ‘King’s Harbour Master’. After 18 months he was relieved and sent to Alexandria to command landing craft, escort vessels and minesweepers in Mediterranean Command. He saw little action beyond fairly heavy bombing whereby several escort vessels were sunk. He remained at Alexandria until the end of war. He was, however, Commended by the Lords of the Admiralty ‘for good work in refloating H.T. Aquitania, which grounded’, and was awarded the Greek Order for rendering valuable services to the Greek Navy. He died on 4 January 1982.


Sold together with extensive original paperwork and award certificates, including Bestowal Documents for the O.B.E., the Greek Order of George I, and the 1935 Jubilee Medal; original Admiralty letter granting unrestricted permission to wear the Greek award; and numerous photographs, many contained in two large half leather bound, gilt blocked photograph albums providing an almost complete history of his naval service both at war and at peace including several photographs taken on a goodwill tour to the U.S.A. one of which features Hollywood star, Tom Mix. The photographs and papers document voyages and tours of duty to Malta, the Americas, Scandinavia, Canada, Caribbean, Mediterranean, North Africa, West Africa and Turkey, including several photos of the aftermath of the earthquake at Messina. Also included are numerous group photos, individual portrait photographs and photographs of naval vessels, taken at different stages of his naval career, the whole forming a fascinating and historic archive of his naval service.


www.dnw.co.uk all lots are illustrated on our website and are subject to buyers’ premium at 24% (+VAT where applicable)


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182