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Miscellaneous 611


Sold together with an erased Police Long Service Medal, E.II.R., 2nd issue. Second Award Date Bars for the Royal Victorian Medal (2), both dated ‘1911-1912’, bronze, both complete with


original affixing ‘pins’, extremely fine, rare (3) 612 £80-£120


A Great War period copy Victoria Cross worn by Private D. R. Lauder, V.C., Royal Scots Fusiliers, contained in the recipient’s original V.C. case of issue


Victoria Cross, copy, the reverse of the suspension bar engraved ‘No. 7709 Pte. D. R. Lauder, 1/4th. Bn. R. Scots Fus.’, reverse of Cross dated ‘13. Aug. 1915’, engraved in the official style and housed in the recipient’s original Great War period case of issue, brown leather and gilt-tooled, the inner lid of the hinged case inscribed ‘Hancocks & Co. Jewellers, Silversmiths, to the King. 25, Sackville Street, London, W.’, the Cross nearly very fine, the case in very good condition (2)


£600-£800


V.C. London Gazette 13 January 1917 ‘For most conspicuous bravery when with a bombing party retaking a sap. Private Lauder threw a bomb, which failed to clear the parapet and fell amongst the bombing party. There was no time to smother the bomb, and Private Lauder at once put his foot on it, thereby localising the explosion. His foot was blown off, but the remainder of the party through this act of sacrifice escaped unhurt.’


David Ross Lauder was born at Easter Glentore, near Airdrie, Scotland, on 31 January 1894, and attested for the Royal Scots Fusiliers (Territorial Force). Mobilised on 4 August 1914, he served with the 1st/4th Battalion during the Great War in Gallipoli from 6 June 1915, and was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry at the Vineyard, south-west of Krithia, Gallipoli, on 13 August 1915. Severely wounded, he was evacuated to Malta, and then to the U.K., where he was fitted with an artificial leg, prior to being discharged in January 1917. He was invested with his Victoria Cross by H.M. King George V at Buckingham Palace on 3 March 1917.


Provenance: Lauder’s Victoria Cross first appeared on the market at Sotheby’s in 1979 and this copy, worn regularly by the recipient, was included in the sale. When the then buyer resold it at Christie’s in 1994, he retained the copy VC as a memento and subsequently gifted it to the present vendor.


x613


Victoria Cross, an official Hancocks & Co, London, replica, the reverse engraved ‘Hancocks 269’, in fitted leather case of issue, extremely fine


£300-£400


The Victoria Cross was instituted on 29 January 1856, with the first awards backdated to 1854, and in the first 150 years of its existence was awarded on 1,355 occasions (1,352 Crosses and 3 Second Award Bars).


To mark the 150th Anniversary, the London jewellers Hancocks, who have manufactured every Victoria Cross ever awarded, issued a limited edition replica, the replicas all individually numbered on the reverse, with the edition limited to 1,352 replica crosses.


Sold together with Hancocks Numbered Certificate of authenticity. 614 615 616 Riband for the Victoria Cross, together with the miniature cross emblem, very good condition Case of Issue: George Cross, by Royal Mint; together with a copy George Cross, extremely good condition £30-£40 £70-£90


Great War ephemera attributed to Sergeant L. Robinson, D.C.M., 74th (Yeomanry) Divisional Signals Company, Royal Engineers, late Denbighshire Hussars


Princess Mary Christmas 1914 Gift Tin, empty apart from Princess Mary Christmas Card; two single riband bars with the riband of the Distinguished Conduct Medal; Royal Engineers brass cap badge; aluminium identity disc ‘D.H.Y. 5226 Robinson L., C.o.E.’; two card identity discs ‘208903 Robinson L., C. of E., R.E.’; brass signallers qualification crossed flags arm badge with four lugs; and bullion and silk embroidered sleeve signallers qualification arm badge, reasonable condition (lot)


£60-£100


D.C.M. London Gazette 1 January 1919, citation published 3 September 1919 and corrected 27 September 1920: ‘For coolness and resourcefulness during operations in the month of September, including those east of Longavesnes and Villers Faucon. He has throughout shown marked ability in the field, grasping difficult situations accurately, and by his conduct setting an example to all ranks under fire. He succeeded in establishing Report Centres for the brigade as the advanced proceeded, keeping in constant touch with attacking battalions and the supporting artillery. This was entirely due to his initiative and energy under difficult conditions.’


Lionel Robinson attested for the Denbighshire Hussars, and served with them during the Great War on the Western Front, subsequently transferring to the 74th Divisional Signal Company, Royal Engineers, and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal with the latter unit. In addition to the D.C.M. Sergeant Robinson was also entitled to the British War and Victory Medals and the Territorial Force War Medal.


www.dnw.co.uk all lots are illustrated on our website and are subject to buyers’ premium at 24% (+VAT where applicable)


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