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To be sold with the following archive:


(i) Thirteen items of insignia including: 12th (2nd Burma Battalion) Madras Infantry Victorian Officer’s shoulder belt plate; 6th Punjab Rifles Victorian Officer’s pouch belt plate; 89th Punjabis Victorian Officer’s helmet plate, hallmarked silver; 92nd Punjabis Officer’s silver cap badge, etc. (ii) Inkwell fashioned from 9 pdr shell case retrieved from Thobal by Grant, case in the shape of a horses’ hoof and engraved ‘Thobal 1st April 1891’, with silver hinged lid, stamped O.R.R., surmounted by a silver cannon, all mounted on a turned mahogany base with a small silver plaque engraved ‘Helen Grant from Her Son’.


(iii) Commission appointing C. J. W. Grant a Lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment, dated 5 May 1882. (iv) Royal Military College Gentleman Cadet’s Certificate, dated December 1881; Examination For Promotion Special Certificate, dated November 1889; Riding Certificate, dated 26 September 1891. (v) Two Parchment copies of Grant’s Record of Officers Service; General Orders of 1891 containing Grant’s V.C. notification and further related correspondence; original handwritten despatch from Brigadier T. Graham, commanding Tammu Column, Manipur: ‘In conclusion I would beg to mention the following officer: Lieut. C. J. W. Grant 12th (Burma) Madras Infantry. This officer has already been reported upon for excellent service done by him on and after the 28 March, when he held his own at Thobal against 2000 of the enemy and 2 guns, although his detachment numbered only about 80 men, having previously turned 800 of them out of the entrenchment he afterwards held. Again at Palel he had his pony shot under him whilst pursuing the enemy on 13 April, and he also led his men to the attack on 25 April when he was badly wounded.’ (vi) Grant’s Officer’s Field Note and Sketch Book and Reconnaissance Aide-Memoire, leather bound, in which he records in detail the march to Manipur, the capture and subsequent defence of Thobal, including several detailed sketches of both actions and positions. An important unpublished primary source. (vii) Folder of original letters, including those negotiating between Grant and the Manipuris and a coded message from Grant in Greek characters to the relief force, with a similar folder of transcripts of the originals and of the diary of events made in his Field Note Book. (viii) A superb scrap book compiled by the recipient replete with numerous annotated photographs taken during the relief expedition, the inside cover with dedication to ‘Douglas & Helen Grant from their loving son, Charlie - 1891’. (ix) Scrap book of newspaper cuttings relating to Grant and the expedition. (x) Copy of Manipur, in red cloth boards - an extremely rare published narrative of the Manipur expedition, and a copy of War Office official Correspondence Relating to Manipur. (xi) Signed portrait photograph of recipient in uniform.


(xii) Official photograph of V.C. Dinner, 9 November 1929, with original named invitation and a handwritten seating plan. (xiii) Several other photographs relating to Grants military career; copies of The Dwarf, dated 4 April 1891; The Graphic, dated 18 April 1891; Punch, dated 25 April 1891; and other documents and ephemera.


www.dnw.co.uk all lots are illustrated on our website and are subject to buyers’ premium at 24% (+VAT where applicable)


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