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FEATURE SPONSOR


OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE


Moving forward into the O&M phase, the oil & gas sector norm is for in-house marine assurance departments to keep compliance continuously up-to-date. Is the same happening throughout the renewables industry? Or are operators moving on into the unknown? If so, there is a deficit here that could be costly.


There is a natural overlap with advances in marine coordination which is becoming much more systematic and procedure- based as site activity matrices become more complex. This again is creating historical and current data. Planned maintenance, permits to work, competent persons and vessel assurance information all dovetails together with marine coordination. The result is a growing data source.


Project marine coordination centres (MCC) have evolved to become a central department, or hub, with an integrated insight into all of these activities.


SETTING THE STANDARD As a Marine Warranty Surveyor (MWS), safeguarding people and assets is one of GMS’ first considerations. Our Vessel surveyors, Civil Engineers and Naval Architects provide an independent third- party review and approval of high-value and/or high-risk marine construction and transportation projects, from the planning to the execution stage.


In addition, we act as a MWS either on behalf of underwriters and their insured, or for contractors requiring the necessary offshore construction support to ensure they meet contractual requirements.


Our role is to confirm whether design, methodologies, plant and people are suitable for the job in hand. We also determine the scale of any risks that cannot be eliminated totally.


HELP US TO HELP YOU


Several large operators are now looking closely at the benefits of asking an experienced third-party to carry out a radical impartial review of their procedures to ensure that their liabilities are minimised and opportunities maximised.


With a fresh pair of trained eyes, it is possible to challenge on-going assumptions that could be out of date and introduce evolving best practice. Introducing common standards would be of great interest to us.


If changes are to be introduced, feedback from operators and contractors is invaluable.


We are happy to be instrumental in helping to collect, co-ordinate and share – with due confidentiality – progressing ways of thinking and working.


LINKS TO MARINE COORDINATION As mentioned, one of marine assurance’s key strengths is that it should be measurable and manageable. The problem in an industry as young as offshore wind is that there are few precedents. So not only what tools are we using but also what are we measuring the effects against?


One of the major developments in the industry is digital systems and their ability to analyse and deduce conclusions from large amounts of data. That helps to create a yardstick.


GMS is currently developing a marine coordination training syllabus to ensure that a new generation of coordinators can cope with the complex operations that are now commonplace on fast-moving programmes.


In addition, GMS’ ROAM (Real-time Operational Asset Management) system is able to manage and issue renewal alerts for essential documentation that is crucial to marine assurance.


Your views could be extremely important. Green Marine Solutions


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ED'S NOTE


A call to arms - please contact the company if you would like to be involved.


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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