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OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE SECTION SPONSOR


Taking a global lead role


Wind energy is the world’s fastest growing renewable energy type. The UK has more usable wind power than any other European country and is the global market leader in offshore wind, with a share of more than 50% of the world’s contribution.


As offshore wind continues to be a valuable and established part of our energy sector, it is vital that wind farms are regularly maintained and repaired to ensure the functionality of the turbines are not compromised.


SHERINGHAM SHOAL WIND FARM 3sun Group, based in Great Yarmouth, provides specialist services in the installation, maintenance and repair of wind turbines globally. The Group recently took a lead role on its first major marine sector project with Statoil, on the Sheringham Shoal wind farm.


Located 21KM off the North Norfolk coast, the wind farm comprises 88 3.6MW wind turbines with an estimated output sufficient to power approximately 220,000 average UK homes.


CORROSION PROTECTION Large capacity turbines such as these, ranging from 3MW to 5MW, use subsea cabling to export power to HVDC converter stations. The turbines are positioned above the water line and supported by subsea structures that require corrosion protection.


The best method for preventing corrosion of subsea structures is a form of cathodic protection involving sacrificial anodes. The use of this more reactive metal allows the turbine structure to become the cathode and the conductivity of seawater ensures it is the anodes that will instead corrode to protect the metal structure of the turbines.


The simplest technique for anode installation is at the construction stage of the turbine, but the use of an underwater matting arrangement allows for easier replacement of anodes once on the seabed. The matting consists of a frame with anodes cast onto it which is connected to the support structure by bonding cables.


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


EAST OF ENGLAND SPOTLIGHT ON


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