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07 NEWS


OBITUARY ROBIN COWGILL


The untimely passing away of a friend to so many, a true expert and stalwart of the black and white breed Robin Cowgill will live in the memory of all who knew him. Married to Jenny, his best friend for almost 30 years, they were always at all events of the Yorkshire Club.


Before this Robin, mentored by the late Frank Chapman, became without question one of the leading cattlemen and judges of the time.


He was wanted all over the UK for his honesty and knowledge of a dairy cow. His incredible memory of the cows he judged was immense and no more so than in 1984. Give or take he had a class of 84 to place and to his passing away could have named the top ten cows. Always the gentleman after judging he would stay longer than judging day. Great Yorkshire Show and the black and white judging were a passion for more than 55 years for Robin and from his place on the promenade he watched and entertained his many friends and met the jewel in the crown Jenny. A member of MMB Dairy Progeny Scheme, he was part of a team assessing daughters of unproven northern bulls. He was made president and a life member of the Yorkshire Club in 1995 and one of his duties was welcoming many guests including the Duke of Westminster at the annual dinner, speaking in his posh English with a Yorkshire Accent. Before leaving, the Duke told Robin he needed to get home early to get some brownie


points, on hearing this Robin knew they had so much in common and had a great night. Robin had a great herd of cows at Wharfside and aided by his loyal staff, Colin Dyke and Stephen Rice, became unstoppable for many years at Club sales. With his friend Jim Collins they had a great sale with leading prices at the time, both were helped by Edward Griffith just a young lad then. Otley show was a passion for Robin and Jenny and due to all his work has become one of the leading shows always attracting a large number of cattle. He will be sadly missed, but I'm sure Jenny will take over his role. I could say so much more about Robin Cowgill, but from everyone who knew you thanks for what you did and for being you.


John Gribbon JOHN M. RICHARDSON


Holstein Club had truly lost a larger than life character. He served for more than 50 years on the Club Council, as well as previously having filled the roles of president and chairman, where he brought to the table a full complement of attributes and experience.


The enormous turnout at the recent funeral of John Moseley Richardson at Warmingham Church, Cheshire, was recognition that the Western


John represented the Club nine times in stock judging competitions and came first at the Royal Show in 1967 in the lnterclub Competition. He also represented the Society at stock judging at the Friesland Show in Holland in 1964. A cattle steward of note, he stewarded at the 75th Anniversary Show, the North Western Dairy Show, and the Royal Show right up to its close. John lived in the village of Warmingham all his life and, with his three sons, had built up a large and modern dairying operation at Church Farm, under the Warmingham prefix. A prefix that was first registered with the Society by his father in 1937. He successfully showed cows at the London Dairy Show and gained many lifelong friends through attending black and white events up and down the country. His lifelong commitment to fully supporting any village community project was unmatched, as was his ability to raise many thousands of pounds for local charities. We send our sincerest condolences to his wife Elizabeth and all his extended family, with the message that we were justifiably proud to have known such a remarkable character.


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