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14


Hand patted butter is also made at Ulceby Grange.


Milk is heated with hot water before the curd is cut and the cheese is made.


distribution system in place to grow sales from zero to 40 tonnes a year. I then took charge of sales, we find that customers prefer dealing with the producer direct,” explains Tim. The Jones brothers have the


unique ability of being two contrasting characters, Tim has a degree in economics and now manages sales and planning. While Simon looks af ter the farm and cheese production, still donning his whites to make cheese every Monday. Milk is pumped over a pipe line


in the yard to the dairy where milk is heated, cut and scalded and the whey separated of f. Af ternoon milk is stored in a


bulk tank overnight and pumped over when morning milking starts, morning milk is piped direct to save on chilling and reheating. This milk is mixed in the vat and heated by hot water which is heated by a wood pellet biomass boiler. “There are two methods of


heating milk to make cheese, with water or steam. We find that using water is less aggressive and makes a better cheese,” says Simon. Cheese is made in 20kg


moulds and af ter storing the truckles weigh 18kg. The maturation process takes a minimum of 15 months with fresh cheese being turned once a week for the first month and


then monthly. “We are lucky to be part of a


great team, everyone has their role and they are all particular about achieving the highest standards. The arable staf f even help in the cheese making and turning process when work on the farm is quieter,” adds Simon. As production increased,


so did the need for storage and a purpose built insulated, refrigerated 20m by 50m shed was erected. The cheese store also has heaters in case the temperature drops too low during winter. Temperature and humidity


have to be regulated at 11 degrees and this is the


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