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spoke to some young people within the Argentinian Government about leadership and challenges in the dairy sector. This gave a great insight into the dairy issues that other youth conference delegates face every day in their countries. It became clear that the current dairy crisis is worldwide and everyone gained a perspective of what dairy farming is like for other people across the world. Following that the group joined the other people who were attending the conference and tasted the Argentinian cuisine while listening to live traditional music.


30th MARCH - WEDNESDAY


Wednesday kicked off with a visit to Campazu Holsteins. Starting from scratch 30 years ago, they now milk 535 cows across a production average of 24.9 litres a cow, with a total area of 600 acres exclusively dedicated to dairy production. The herd is split in to three, with each sub-herd milked through a separate parlour and averaging 3.94%F and 3.44%P and a daily average production of 13, 346 litres. When cows are 60 days post-calving, they are bred in a one-acre plot being fed two dairy rations of alfalfa roll. At a year old heifers are moved to a ranch in Rauch or Tandil to complete their growth and be inseminated with conventional semen at 17 months, heading back to the main herd one month before calving. Cows calve all year round except during summer as the severe heat can cause stress. Before they attend any shows, the show cows are put into a separate tie-stall barn. The herd currently includes 17 EX cows and one 100t cow. More than 20 bulls from the herd have been sold to AI studs and the herd sells 30-40 breeding bulls a year.


31st MARCH - THURSDAY


Thursday was the WHFF Conference where speakers included the likes of Alejandro R Castillo who said economists believe things will pick up in the dairy industry and that milk is an essential part of the adult diet due to high levels of nutrients and components. Meanwhile, Brian Van Doormaal from CDN talked about where the breed is going with genomics. He stated that genomics is more accurate in young animals than ever before. With genomics, it is now possible to identify recessive anomalies which, in 2009, were unknown. Mr Van Doormaal also said that farmers needed to be pro-active and manage inbreeding as few countries have a different genetic pool due to the rate of genetic progress. Fellow speakers Tom Lawler from Holstein USA outlined the dangers of crossbreeding and Andrew Hunt from Bullvine talking about the future of genomics.


Nicky Lockyer was the winner of the Youth Photo Competition and walked away with the winning prize - a Samsung mobile phone.


L-R Andrew Patton, Nicky Lockyer, Lydia Griffiths and Michael Yates at Boca Juniors football stadium.


L-R Andrew, Lydia, Nicky, Emma and Michael in the street museum at Caminito.


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