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2001 and are averaging 8400kg at 4%bf and 3.3%p. The bactoscan runs at 10 and under and cell count at 150. “Making cheese from raw milk


means hygiene is extremely important, so we have invested in a washing machine for reusable teat cloths so each teat is cleaned thoroughly before milking,” says Simon. Being in Lincolnshire with


an endless supply of straw everything is loose housed and the milking herd is run as one group with four loose yards and a loafing area between them. Paul Findley from Bestfed advices on nutrition and the milkers are fed a TMR of 50:50 grass silage and maize silage, 10kg fodder beat, caustic wheat and a homemade premix of GM free soya, sugar beet pellets, wheat distillers, seaweed meal, homegrown beans and minerals. Fortnightly fertility visits


are held with Lincolnshire Vet Solutions and scanning is carried out monthly by an independent scanner. Eight years ago a roll over


crush was invested in and Simon believes it has been well worth it. “Having a good foot trimming crush has helped massively with foot health and preventing lameness. It was a big cost, but through the cheese it is one of the things we have been able to invest in on the farm.” Heifers are calved between 24


and 27 months old, all calving to easy calving conventional Holstein semen. All young stock are reared on the farm and bull calves are sold to a local farmer at 10 days old. Alternative energy has also


been embraced with a 275kWh wind turbine, two biomass boilers; one to heat water for cheese production and the other heating water for the parlour and also heating seven houses, as well as ground source heating in the of fices. Future plans for the family are


to tighten up the business. With more competition in the market Simon and Tim are focussed on improving every aspect of the business to continue to improve quality.


The herd is all loose housed because of the availability of straw.


17


Next year marks 100 years of family farming at Ulceby Grange, this family picture was taken in 1917.


Simon making the first batch of cheese with Dougal Campbell in 1992.


Calves are reared in igloos, a healthy environment away from the rest of the cattle.


A 275kw wind turbine provides enough electricity for the farm to be self sufficient plus some extra sold back to the grid.


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