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looking in to A2 UHT for Germany and the United Arab Emirates which will hopefully increase demand.” Müller DNA tested the herd and with 52% testing positive for A2:A2 Andrew realised it could be possible to build on this. Andrew sold 40% of cows that tested negative for A2:A2, some of these sold to Shanael, while some cattle were swapped with Paul Stubbs for A2:A2 positive cattle.


“Swapping cows has worked well in order to get in to new families, it is mutually beneficial and doesn’t cost any money to either person. I swapped an Ambrosia with Simon Davies of Castellhyfryd, for a Million Rosina that classified VG88 as a second calver. I’ve also swapped embryos in the past.”


Müller gave top up payments to A2:A2 registered producers to buy A2:A2 positive cows to build up their herds and they also offered to test a herd that was advertised to be dispersed if three A2:A2 producers requested it to be tested, including the Holmland and Saltgate herds. Young stock are tested twice a year by Müller, positive cattle are tagged with a blue A2 tag which Müller over sea the tagging of. The milking herd at Rossett is now 100% positive for A2:A2 with only


a handful of young stock testing negative.


Jenny was adamant that when they chose the A2 route she didn’t want to lose the families that they had spent years building up and developing, so Andrew has bred them to A2 positive bulls and kept heifer calves and sold the milker on. ““It is the pedigrees that we enjoy and the important thing for me was to make a premium out of the milk they produce. We have managed to keep all of the families by keeping heifer calves and breeding them to A2 bulls. Any negative cattle are calved down and sold fresh, their milk isn’t put in the tank. “After three years of focusing on A2 production and the genetics to achieve that we have had to run an older herd than we would have liked through the transition until the numbers built back up. Now for the first time this winter we have had most heifers calving positive for A2:A2 and been able to keep them. This is allowing us to start focussing on culling older cows that have feet or cell count problems.” Andrew selects bulls that are positive for A2 and immunity plus. While achieving both narrows the pool of bulls down he finds he is still able to select good bulls.


“My selection criteria for sires is conformation, particularly rumps, legs and feet, A2 positive and immunity plus. Sires in the tank include Doorman, Meridian, Flame and Dominic and Excalibur is used as a sweeper bull. Heifers are served to sexed semen with Flame the current bull and Sandy-Valley Cabriol the next bull being used. Immunity Plus is something Andrew believes is another added benefit at no additional cost to the semen. “Health traits are highly heritable and the benefits of disease resistance and cow welfare are worth focussing on, another bonus is the better response to vaccines.”


Andrew and Jenny took over the tenancy of the 100 acre council holding from Andrew’s parents in 1997. His parents dispersed the milking herd and the machinery and young stock were bought by Andrew and Jenny.


The herd was built back up and then the cows sold to Colin and Yvonne Dent for their Bridgend herd in 2002 when they restocked after foot and mouth. This money was invested in houses and they were sold in 2007 along with an on farm sale of milkers when the opportunity arose to buy the farm.


Andrew and Jenny took over the council tenancy of the 100-acre Rackery Farm from Andrew’s parents in 1997 and then took the opportunity to buy in 2007.


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