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Table 1.6.Definition of Feature Types of Archaeological Interest Feature type


Description Channel


Gravel Terrace/Coarse Sediment Unit


Bank Cut and Fill


Depression


Fine-grained Unit Peat


Organic Matter


Channel cuts and associated infill deposits. May indicate extensions of present-day terrestrial system or now unconnected channels. May include both fluvial and estuarine environments. Can be described as filled, underfilled and unfilled. Archaeological potential for in situ and secondary context artefacts. Infill deposits may also be of palaeoenvironmental interest.


Features associated with the edge of channel features, or within channel features. Archaeological potential for in situ and secondary context artefacts


As channel features. Cut and fill is used as a descriptor when the feature of interest cannot be traced over distance. Generally used for isolated features. Can be described as simple (one phase of fill) or complex (multiple phases of infill)


Small isolated infilled feature which may include remnant features formed by erosion or be associated with inter-tidal deposits. Potential for in situ and secondary context artefacts. Infill deposits may also be of palaeoenvironmental interest.


Indicator of former terrestrial land surface. Potential for in situ and secondary context artefacts. Deposits are of palaeoenvironmental interest. Generally associated with other features such as channels or cut and fill features.


Seismic Blanking


Gas blanking masks the seismic reflectors and is caused by the presence of shallow gas. Shallow gas may indicate the presence of organic matter/peat at a particular layer caused by microbial activity. Shallow gas can also be sourced from depth migrating to the surface along migration pathways. Discrimination is made during the assessment and only shallow gas thought to be associated with the presence of organic matter is recorded. Generally associated with channel infills, cut and fill features and erosion surfaces.


High Amplitude Reflector


Erosion Surfaces


May indicate either hard ground layer or layer containing organic matter.


These tend to be broad scale features associated with erosion during transgression and regression. May include ravinement surfaces (transgressive erosion surface resulting from nearshore marine and shoreline erosion associated with a sea level rise)


98. Only features thought to have formed during the period of human occupation of the East Anglia THREE site were interpreted, i.e. from c. 970,000 BP to the last marine transgression.


Preliminary Environmental Information May 2014


East Anglia THREE Offshore Windfarm


Appendix 17.2 Archaeological Review of


Geophysical and Geotechnical Data: Technical Report


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