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three Dutch ships and four ships from the combined English and French fleet lost at the Battle of Sole Bay.


50.


These lost warships are yet to be confidently located and it is possible that their remains may lie within the East Anglia THREE site or offshore cable corridor. There is an NRHE record of a documented loss within the wider area (arbitrarily located at the mouth of the Rivers Stour and Orwell), described as the wreck of an English storeship captured in 1653 from the Dutch during the First Anglo-Dutch War (NRHE 902051). As further testament to this potential, between 2005 and 2013, 16 cannonballs were reported from the East coast dredging region through the Marine Aggregates Protocol for Reporting Finds of Archaeological Interest.


51.


In addition to this global explosion in trade and naval warfare, the East Coast economy was still underpinned by local trade and marine exploitation. The fishing industry continued to thrive with the developed quays of Southwold and Lowestoft and the established ports of Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn prospering following their expansion with the Icelandic cod fishing fleets during the mid 17th and 18th centuries (Gould 1997), particularly with the development of deep sea fishing in the 19th century (Rasmussen 1985:217). There are two NRHE records of whaling ships lost in the area (NRHE 1300333, 1340044), each of which are assigned to a named location within the East Anglia THREE offshore cable corridor.


52.


In the 18th century, East Anglia was at the forefront of the ‘Agricultural Revolution’ whereby communications were developed to serve the farming economy and to facilitate the diverse trade of Norfolk and Suffolk of which grain was the principal export (Gilman 1997:67).


53. Although there is significantly more historical data for maritime activities in this period, particularly with regard to East India Company shipping and Naval warfare, the number of known wrecks from the 16th to early 19th centuries remains low, although a larger number of records relating to known sites exists in comparison to earlier periods. For example, the Early Ships and Boats project (Wessex Archaeology 2013) identified 34 and 68 records with a date range that falls between the Mid to Late Tudor period (1540 to 1603) and the Stuart period (1603 to 1714) respectively, as well as an additional 145 with a date range falling within the Hanoverian period (1714-1837) (although a number of these will post-date 1815). Despite this, known examples of wrecks dating to this period are still rare in comparison to those post- dating 1840. Additionally, the smaller vessels and local craft employed in the day to day activities of coastal communities, and deployed as auxiliary vessels to the Royal Navy, are still comparatively absent from both the historical and archaeological


Preliminary Environmental Information May 2014


East Anglia THREE Offshore Windfarm


Appendix 17.1 Potential Archaeological Receptors


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