This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
offshore cable corridoris recorded to have been constructed of steel. Metal wrecks were also considered to represent worse navigational hazards to shipping than their wooden counterparts and were recorded more scrupulously as a result. Despite this, of the known and dated charted wreck sites within the East Anglia THREE site and offshore cable corridor, none have been assigned to the date range 1816-1913. However, with further data acquisition, it is possible that any one of the currently unidentified and undated charted wrecks or obstructions represent the remains of the 50 documented losses yet to be located.


62. Nonetheless, known wrecks identified as dating between 1816 and 1913 are more plentiful in the archaeological resource in comparison to those dating to earlier periods. This is particularly the case for wrecks dating from the mid 19th century onwards. While the Early Ships and Boats project identified 384 records in England’s wreck resource from the prehistoric period to 1840 (Wessex Archaeology 2013), the Assessing Boats and Ships 1860-1913 project (Wessex Archaeology 2011b) identified 518 wrecks in England’s wreck resource dating to a 53 year period alone, spanning 1860 to 1913. Due to the number of records, for a wreck of this period to be of special interest, it is likely to have to make a distinctive contribution in respect of a number of integral factors. It must also be considered to have relative merit in comparison to other wrecks or surviving vessels of the period. The special interest of boats and ships of this period is likely to be multi-faceted. Consequently, any wrecks from this period that may be discovered within the East Anglia THREE site and offshore cable corridor may only be of special interest if the remains can make a specific contribution to current knowledge and understanding.


1.3.5 1914 to 1945 AD 63.


The East Coast was subject to a high level of hostility throughout both World Wars, with the East Anglian region providing a focus for military activity. The 34 known wrecks within the Study Area lost during periods of hostility are testament to this (one within EA3 – WA 71012 and 33 within the East Anglia THREE offshore cable corridor). There are an additional four documented shipping losses dating to this period (Appendix 17.3, Section 1.2). The rapid technological advances of the preceding century facilitated the development of more homogenous naval fleets of larger, faster and more durable vessels, heavily armed and incorporating the widespread use of submersibles.


64. A great number of vessels were lost during the World Wars, including both warships and submarines, but a much greater number of merchant vessels were lost as the disruption and destruction of shipping became an established military tactic. Large numbers of mines were laid by the Germans off the East Coast while German U-


Preliminary Environmental Information May 2014


East Anglia THREE Offshore Windfarm


Appendix 17.1 Potential Archaeological Receptors


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205