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magnetic anomaly measuring 2409nT visible as a large distinctive dipole anomaly across survey two lines.


55.


In the bathymetry data this wreck is discernible as possibly lying on its keel with some visible super-structure. It is orientated approximately north by south and located in an area of sand ripples. The UKHO records this vessel as a British minesweeper of 710 gross tons measuring 70.4m in length, 8.5m in beam and 2.1m in draught (SeaZone 11058). The HMS Fitzroy was built in 1919 and was sunk by a mine off Great Yarmouth on the 27th May 1942. The remains of the wreck are described by the UKHO as being partially buried and partially broken up. This is recorded as a Live wreck.


1.2.9 Wreck 71017 56.


71017 is the location of a wreck, but it is only observed as a seafloor disturbance in the geophysical data, this was also identified in the ZEA (Figure 17.24). This is a curious looking large seafloor disturbance anomaly on a very uneven and sand wave rich part of the seabed which might conceal possible buried wreck remains. The anomaly has dimensions of 112.2m x 38.1m x 1.7m and comprises a scattering of small dark reflectors, some with shadows and some without. These are visible as hard edged anomalies on a rough and uneven part of the seabed. There is a medium sized magnetic anomaly associated with these remains measuring 28nT which suggests ferrous material is present.


57.


The UKHO describes this as an unidentified live wreck detected in 1995 with dimensions of 36m x 13m x 2.1m (SeaZone 11267). The survey data indicates that this is an entire wreck broken in two pieces lying some 20m apart and aligned southeast by northwest. The wreck is associated with a large magnetometer deflection.


1.2.10 Wreck 71020 58.


71020 is an unidentified wreck made up of dispersed remains located in the very northern extent of the East Anglia THREE site (Figure 17.25). The wreck remains comprise tens of hard edged and diffuse dark reflectors with shadows which are visible as individual structural elements making up the highly broken up and abraded remains on the seabed. The wreck has dimensions of 58.7m x 24.7m x 1.6m. This area of the seabed has frequent sand waves, which could be concealing more of the wrecks structure and possibly associated debris and/or cargo. There is a very large magnetic anomaly associated with this wreck measuring 7682nT.


59. Preliminary Environmental Information May 2014


The UKHO record this as an unknown wreck that was first detected in 1995 (SeaZone 11212). The vessel has recorded dimensions of 36m x 20m x 1.4 m and the survey East Anglia THREE Offshore Windfarm


Appendix 17.2 Archaeological Review of


Geophysical and Geotechnical Data: Technical Report


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