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PROJECT / TITANIC BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND


MAIDEN VOYAGE - This is the only point where visitors can see into the exhibition from the Atrium. SVA therefore wanted to link Maiden Voyage with the Atrium graphics to help visitors make this connection. Atrium spotlights consist of Precision Lighting Evo 20 LED spotlights and ETC Source Four projectors.


(Precision Lighting Pico 1) inside showcases at high and low level and the use of fibre optics in wall-recessed display cases. The dimming of the track-mounted spotlights is determined by the brightness of the AV. Ad- justable track mounted spotlights are also fitted within the structural ceiling beams. Sutton Vane Associates used spotlights hous- ing tungsten halogen AR111 lamps chosen for their extremely narrow beam optics and excellent colour consistency. The majority of spotlights used are Light Projects’ Toucan 2 (444 fixtures in total). A track lighting sys- tem was implemented to allow for LED re- placements in the future. All the luminaires are dimmed to help maximise lamp life


GALLERY 1: THE ARROL GANTRY The Arrol Gantry is a transitional space that links the ‘calmer’ environment of the Harland & Wolff drawing office with the ‘hustle and bustle’ located within the Shipyard (the Dark Ride). The proposal was to create the look and feel of a worker arriving at the shipyard first thing in the morning. The lighting is dramatic and the- atrical with a theatrical hazer (Martin Jem K) installed at low level and a single 150W ETC Source Four projector hidden at high level (on Level 4) that creates the effect


of early morning sunshine through mist and emphases the industrial nature of the tall and intimidating gantry rising up above. Matt black walls absorb any light spill and provide a black backdrop like a theatrical set. SVA also liaised with the lift designers and suppliers to ensure that spill was mini- malised from within the carriages and that general levels were as low as safety would allow. The illumination of the graphics also creates ambient light. Floor-mounted objects (chains, timber blocks, steel plates) are lit by spotlights attached to the outer section of the Gantry. At high level, the lighting has more of an industrial feel with luminaires bolted to the gantry structure. The challenge was to keep light away from the projector screen to avoid bleaching it out and illuminate the graphics around the perimeter while providing a safe level of reflected light.


GALLERY 2: THE DARK RIDE Visitors experience the sights, sounds and smells of working life within the Shipyard as they move through the Arrol Gantry and join the queue line for the Dark Ride. It was important that the sense of anticipa- tion created is maintained while visitors are standing in the queue. Low levels of light


repeat the ambience that was created by the Gantry experience. Sutton Vane Associates and Mike Stoane Lighting developed a DMX-controlled track mounted LED lighting system specially for the project that allows each spotlight to be individually pointed and controlled, based on a combination of Mike Stoane MN7, Surf Type N, Type S and Type X spotlights. The lighting is activated via AV show control (iDrive Quad by IST integrated System Technologies) determined by the exact position of the cars that move at a constant speed without stopping at all times. Each car has a scissor lower / raising mechanism to allow for the full double height space to be utilised. The cars also turn through 360 degrees so that it could be directed to each scene. Passengers can see the car in front and behind. It was therefore impera- tive the lighting created drama without compromising the experience for others. A range of ‘tricks’ were used to keep eyes focused away from other scenes. Where this could not be achieved lighting was configured in such a way to be ambiguous enough so as not to ruin any effect for the next car of visitors. The ride involves ten scenes along with the loading and unload- ing areas. A mixture of 3000K and 4000K is


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