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LIGHT + BUILDING / YOUNG DESIGN


KO FLORIANA


Inspired by the na- ture of New Zealand and handcrafted in Germany, the conca(...) range uses ash veneers to form a husk-like


shape that glows from within. It is avail- able in three types: the conca (...terra) floor lamp, conca (...pendo) floor lamp and conca (...muro) wall lamp.


DELIKATDESIGN


Delikatdesign’s Papilio has a form that logically follows the shape of its LED light source. The thin shape of its winged head lends itself to


the shallow depth of the LEDs, while the large surface areas serve as a heat sink – aided by the thermal conductivity of the aluminium casing. The piece can provide both cool and comfortable warm light, dimmed using a touch-sensitive controls to further enhance Papilio’s sleek, button-free appearance. “We combine suitable, harmonious shapes with advanced, new technologies,” says Delikatdesign’s Peter Lasch. “User friend- liness, function and enthusiasm for the product are the focus of our work.” www.delikatdesign.de


“Light captivates us. Nature captivates us. Both impacts flourish in my creative work processes - being enriched with functional- ity,” says designer Floriana Meike Ohldag. www.kofloriana.com


DANIEL BECKER


Sparks is a modular lighting system com- prising three differ- ent shapes that can be arranged in vari- ous configurations to form a three-di- mensional structure.


Each module can be rotated freely in 360° which makes the whole system easily adaptable to every possible architectural situation. Thus the piece appears com- pletely different depending on the spatial context. The system works with low-energy LED modules to minimise impact on the environment.


“My main approach is to achieve an emo- tional durability in my creations,” says Becker. “I don’t want my designs to be fash- ionable or ‘trendy’. They should have long life-spans and bring joy to the people who live with them for a long time. That means they shouldn’t be too loud in their appear- ance and should fit well into many different environments. It’s also very important to me that they have a high build quality, last for a long time and, not least, age grace- fully.” www.danielbecker.eu


STUDIO DREIMAN


Jonas Ette, Simon Kux, Tim Prigge where all born in the 80s in Han- nover, Germany, and first met while studying product design at the city’s University of Applied Sciences. After graduating in January 2010 they founded Studio Dreimann, creating and designing consumer goods, industrial goods and furniture. The team’s designs are not determined by


a formal style, rather Studio Dreimann aims to take familiar shapes and imbue them with a new function. This results in products that feel both new and instantly recognis- able: items that are loaded with additional emotional value.


Stanly is a case in point. Its shape is bor- rowed from the traditional, hand held barber’s mirror. What was once the hand strap now becomes a curved bracket along which the cable attachment can slide - thus adjusting the angle of the piece. www.studiodreimann.com


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