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NOTA BENE ARCHITECT: KUWABARA PAYNE MCKENNA BLUMBERG ARCHITECTS Nota Bene restaurant, located on Toronto’s lively bohemian Queen Street West, is surrounded by the financial, judicial, and performing arts districts. The modern 175 seat restaurant designed by Ku- wabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects offers a much lauded seasonal Asian and Latin flavoured menu created by one of the city’s premier chefs. The discreet entrance to the restaurant is subtly lit in counterpoint to the slash of chartreuse coloured light on the façade. The casual bar stretches across the front with a view of street life outside. Dif- ferent luminaires define the areas of the restaurant: the recessed red ceiling slots with their wine coloured glass pendants hover over window tables; the custom steel pendant mirrors the long bar and the series of light filled acrylic columns separate the bar from the dining room. Elevated behind the bar is the elegant modern dining room with its Brazilian cherry wood floors and chartreuse leather banquettes.


KENNETH E. BEHRING FAMILY HALL OF MAMMALS SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY CLIENT: SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION


EXHIBIT DESIGNER: REICH + PETCH DESIGN INTERNATIONAL The National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC is the most visited museum in the world with over 10 million visitors annually. The


25,000 square foot, 55 foot tall Kenneth E. Behring Family Hall of Mam- mals with its newly revealed glass skylight was restored to its beaux art origins in counterpoint to the modern exhibit displays created by Reich + Petch Design International.


Lit from large free-standing custom armatures, the displays resemble abstract theatre sets where the specimens become actors posed on minimal platforms punctuated with only essential props.


The main space of the hall showcases the African Savanna at a mo-


ment of transformation. At the apex of the dry season animals jostle for a space to drink at the watering hole. There is a distant rumble of thunder. The rain approaches. From the direction of the towering


rainforest display, the lighting in the gallery transforms the scene with a crack of lightning, and angry purple clouds above move from one end


of the skylight to the other. And finally, as the storm recedes, beams of sunlight peek through the canopy of the rainforest


SUZANNE POWADIUK DESIGN


• OWNER: Suzanne Powadiuk • HEAD OFFICE: Toronto, Canada • ESTABLISHED: 1989 • CURRENT PROJECTS: Holt Renfrew, Toronto, Canada, (Janson Goldstein Architects), Aga Khan Museum, Toronto, Canada, (Maki and Associates, Moriyama & Teshima Architects), Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario, Toronto, Canada, (Kuwabara, Payne, McKenna, Blumberg Architects), Geminis Office and Art Foundation, Hong Kong, China, (Shim-Sutcliffe Architects/dk studio), Shan- gri-La Living, Toronto, Canada, (James KM Cheng Architects), Canadian Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial, Ottawa, Canada, (Douglas Coup- land and Plant Branch Architects) www.spdlighting.com


“I sense Light as the giver of all presences, and material as spent Light. What is made by Light casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.” Louis Kahn


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