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PROJECT / TITANIC BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND


THE SINKING - The lighting is designed to support the narrative of the AV projections as if the visitor were viewing Titanic sinking from within a lifeboat. Rosco X24 projectors housing water effect gobos provide depth and animate the floor. A star-cloth from UFO links the ceiling with the projection screen.


of these spaces, though each space always maintains its own unique feel. In addition to supporting the narrative of the exhibition, the lighting is designed to create a sense of arrival, anticipation and excitement and supports the wayfinding strategy developed by interior design consultant Kay Elliot.


BASEMENT LEVELS -1 & -2


For most visitors, the basement foyers are the beginning of the journey into the build- ing. The two main challenges were that the lighting within the car park is purely functional and flooding the space with light would have done little to create the feeling of intrigue and anticipation needed for the beginning of the journey up to the atrium. To make the entrance more enticing, light levels are slightly subdued to give the feel- ing that the visitor is at the very bottom of the ship. Light from the escalators above spills down into the space and the large graphic panels are lit by luminaires at high level. Lighting is incorporated within and around the ceiling details of Basement Level -1, hidden around the perimeter of the sus- pended wooden panels. This ambient light adds depth and form to the ceiling area


helping provide a sense of arrival.


ATRIUM The Atrium is dramatically lit, drawing on the language of the shipyard. The scale of the building is emphasised to create a slightly intimidating and imposing feel at ground floor level, achieved by lighting the outer wall surfaces without lighting the structural supports and the underside of the escalators and walkways. The escalators are unlit, with only a small amount of light at each end of the travelator for safety purposes, to create a sense of intrigue and adventure for visitors as they pass through the building.


The ground floor uses low levels of re- flected light with only a small amount of directional downlight for the bronze central ‘compass rose’ motif. Daylight creates clear vistas through the building and a connection with the natural surrounding environment. In general, light levels are below CIBSE lighting guides but this is considered to be both appropriate and helpful to prepare visitors for the darker environment within the exhibition spaces. In addition, dimming and subtle movement of light helps animate


the space in a controlled and subtle way. This need to create dramatic lighting with- out compromising safety was built into the lighting strategy from the start. The general lighting approach for the ticketing and the retail spaces is for light to filter through the various ceiling slots and ‘rivet’ holes. This ambient light is sufficient for visitors to circulate through the space but also gives the area identity. XAL Frame 25 recessed linear LEDs create Morse Code dot/dash effects in the ceiling and over 100 Precision Lighting Evo 20 LED spotlights (with 4000K CREE LEDs) are used for circulation spaces and lighting graphic information.


THE ATRIUM: FEATURE WALL The Feature Wall is the largest and most dramatic feature within the Atrium. Rather than washing the wall with light, Mike Stoane Surf Type X (DMX) spotlights are discreetly located within the structure, with dimming up and down at various rates used to create the illusion of searchlights motioning along the wall and creating a dy- namic effect that highlights both the form and the material of the wall.


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