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106


LIGHT + BUILDING / LED REVIEW Year


2011 2012 2013 2015


Performance (Lm/W)


45 60 80


135


Lifetime (L70) kHrs


12 15 20 40


Table 2 Road map White OLED performance from LG Chem.


Luceos ROP OLED modules are equipped with a magnetic holder which makes them easy to install and replace in lighting ap- plications. The dimmable modules in the Lureon REM product series are characterised by an ex- tremely low profile. The benefits of OLEDs are apparent in stylish designer luminaires or unobtrusive area light sources. The series was developed primarily for innova- tive lighting concepts – whether in designer long-run office luminaires, for architectural lighting over a large area or as a fully inte- grated illuminated ceiling or wall. In terms of OLED developments the current technology leader is definitely LG Chem who presented 60lm/W panels that are available immediately. LG Chem is a US$20 billion business that specialises in three seg- ments of petrochemicals, batteries and IT & electronic materials. LG Chem started mass production of OLED panels in October 2011 with 45lm/W panels, which have already increased to 60lm/W in 2012 with CCT’s of 3000K, 3500K and 4000K. The OLED panels are some of the largest in the industry at 150mm x 150mm. The LG Chem roadmap predicts outstanding performance by 2015 as table 2 shows. Impressively, it isn’t just performance that LG Chem are focusing upon; they believe that they have the production capacity and technology to move to a new generation (Gen 5) facility that will reduce production costs from $2000 per kiloLumen to $50-$100 by 2015 which makes OLEDs a viable general lighting solution that complements LED products.


LEDs - more efficiency, more lumens, same story There was of course a large number of LED based products launched from virtually all the major manufacturers and although many of the product designs certainly looked better than two years ago, when products looked like rushed prototypes in old fixtures, there was little innovation and few products caught my eye. One that did was the Bridgelux stand with a mass of colours as shown in figure 10. The stand was created to highlight the differ- ences in white light illumination for retail purposes as Bridgelux were demonstrating


their LED arrays in a variety of colour tem- peratures and CRI from 80 to 98 and 2700 to over 4000K. Bridgelux demonstrated the new Micro SM4, a multiple die emitter which is claimed to dramatically reduce the component count, cost, complexity and size of diffuse or directional lamps. The new product lever- ages design and manufacturing advances at Bridgelux and expands the company’s broad portfolio of solid-state lighting solutions. The Micro SM4 component also delivers high flux density in a smaller footprint, giving designers, architects and lamp manufac- turers greater freedom when it comes to creating and illuminating interior spaces. Using only 4.2W of power, the Bridgelux Micro SM4 component will deliver between 330 and 500 lumens in both warm white (2700K and 3000K) and cool white (5600K) colour temperatures. Minimum 80 and 90 CRI options, with 3-step MacAdam Ellipse colour selections, will be offered for warm white products. The new Micro SM4 light source features the latest technical ad- vancements in epitaxial GaN layer growth, LED chip design and automated packaging technologies. Bridgelux emphasised that they are a world leader in LED technology on Silicon sub- strates and over the next two years they will look to introduce production-ready high performance LEDs based on silicon sub- strates that will slash the cost of LEDs and arrays significantly. Indeed, Bridgelux has created a partnership with Toshiba to de- liver high efficacy GaN on silicon LEDs that have already yielded hugely successful re- sults that are as good as most leading LEDs manufacturers’ products based on Sapphire or Silicon Carbide substrates. For example, Bridgelux recently achieved the industry’s top results based on an 8” GaN on silicon LED chip which emitted 614mW of optical power in blue at a forward voltage less than 3.1V at 350mA with 1.1mm square chip. What is impressive is that the use of GaN on silicon not only offers lower cost materials but can use the same substrate sizes found in conventional electronics manufacturing so we could see 12” diameter production shortly which is fully automated so produc- tion costs will reduce significantly also. This is a very exciting development indeed and


Brightness (Cd/M^2)


3000 3000 4000 4000


Max Panel Size (mm)


100 x 100 150 x 150 150 x 150 300 x 300


I look forward to production volumes which will help drive down the overall pricing of LED fixtures. Cree also announced another industry first with a barrier-breaking 254lm/W white R&D power LED. This significant milestone exceeds Cree’s previous R&D industry record of 231 lumens per watt and is based on standard phosphor converted white technology. Elements of Cree’s innovative SC3 Tech- nology Platform, available today in Cree XLamp LEDs, enabled this record-breaking R&D result. The SC3 Technology Platform is built upon Cree’s advanced silicon carbide technology, features advancements in LED chip architecture and phosphor, and boasts a new package design to deliver the most advanced LED components in the industry. Cree reports that the LED efficacy was achieved at a correlated colour tempera- ture of 4408K. Standard room temperature, 350mA testing, was used to achieve the results. Again, this new efficacy record shows that it will be possible to purchase LED products in the marketplace by 2015 that achieve in excess of 250 lumens per watt and this should enable the vast majority of LED fixtures to be close to 125lm/W with high performance products close to 175lm/W. Cree also launched the new XLamp MT-G2 LED, which delivers 25 percent brighter LEDs compared to the previous MT-G, enabling a wider spectrum of high lumen applications. The MT-G2 LEDs are optimised for use in track, accent, lamp retrofit, downlighting and other applications where colour quality, consistency and optical con- trol are required. The MT-G2 LED delivers up to 2100 lumens in warm white (3000K) at 25W, 85°C and provides one of the industry’s best colour consistencies, with superior optical control. The new, brighter MT-G2 LED shares the same footprint as the original MT-G LED (8.9mm x 8.9mm), provid- ing customers a seamless upgrade path. The new LEDs are available in minimum 80 and 90 CRI options and feature multiple voltage selections, including higher voltages that enable the use of smaller, more efficient drivers to lower system cost.


Figure 10 The Bridgelux stand.


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