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Figure 3 The latest Orbeos SDW-058 OLED panel from OSRAM.


Impressively, both fixtures achieve 51lm/W total system efficacy from LG panels that reach 60lm/W which makes both luminaires highly usable from an energy efficiency perspective. If one ignores cost at this stage (just don’t ask right now!) and compares the total system performance to LED panels (~70-80lm/W) generating similar light levels ,then both these OLED fixtures are surpris- ingly very close. The fixtures offer a CRI >80 with positive R9 values meaning an improved colour rendi- tion. The L70 lifetime of the fixtures are quoted at 15,000 hours rated at 25ºC and luminous uniformity is >85%. OSRAM also demonstrated their latest OLED offering, the Orbeos SDW-058 with a light emitting surface area of 110cm2


as shown


in figure 3. The main difference between OSRAM’s offering and that of LG is the large gap in lumens per watt with the latest Or- beos OLEDs trailing with only 40lm/W. The OLED team at OSRAM are confident that the performance will soon ramp up and cite the fact they believe the Orbeos has excellent production colour consistency and the lat- est versions of OLED panels now have twice the brightness and lifetime as their previous generations. Philips also launched its latest iteration of Lumiblade OLED GL350 panel which offers an unprecedented combination of lumen output and size at an attractive price-per- formance ratio, making OLED lighting more viable than ever before for general lighting applications. Each square GL350 OLED panel (shown in figure 4) offers a lumen output of 115 lumens and a size of 155cm2


, approximately


three times larger than any existing OLED panels. It is available in sets of three pan- els, offering a combined light output of 350 lumens. The latest iteration of OLED panel performance means only three panels are needed compared to twelve or more previ- ously to achieve 350 lumens.


Figure 4 The new GL350 OLED panel from Philips.


Each GL350 panel delivers 120 lumens of light from 14.3V and 500mA (or 7.3W) giv- ing 16.7lm/W at a CCT of 3250K and a CRI >90. The luminance is 4000cd/m2


within


an active area of 103.8mm x 103.8mm and lifetime to L50 is 10,000 hours. Philips also showed the LivingShapes Interactive Wall as an example of what can be done with OLEDs. The wall reacted to movement in front of it, which was trans- lated into light impulses that illuminated the room in an atmospheric light. Other features include text displays, a video interface and a microphone that transforms surrounding noise into light displays. The interactive wall also distinguishes itself by its modular design. Numerous panels can be arranged either side by side or on top of one another, thus quickly creating an il- luminated surface of several square metres, offering designers flexibility in the creation of lighting installations as shown in figure 5. Sumitomo Chemical of Japan, owner of Cambridge Display Technologies, exhibited its Polymer OLED technology for the first time at Light + Building with the theme ‘The Colours of Japan – The Colours of Har- mony’, in an innovative attempt to replicate - by means of lighting - the refined and


Figure 6 The Sumitomo Chemical 60 ‘Colours of Japan’ OLED stand.


traditional colours of Japan in a modern day setting of a Japanese tearoom. The booth - created under the artistic direction of renowned Japanese lighting designer Motoko Ishii - displayed large-scale lighting panels of about 10 centimetres square each, illuminating in 60 differ- ent colours, that are produced by coating everything except for the electrodes with printing technology. Varying shades of colour soothed visitors comfortably with the world of Japanese traditional colours from the distant past. Sumitomo Chemical is the first in the world to have successfully produced large-scale lighting panels with the printing method in so many colours showing the excellent possibilities of generating bespoke colours using this single printable layer technology. The thickness of the polymer material is 1μm or less, and glass is used as a base sub- strate material. The brightness and lumi- nous efficiency of the panel are 1,000cd/m2 and 10lm/W respectively so are still some way behind vacuum coated OLED material, however Sumitomo’s roadmap shows 60-80 lm/W by 2015. Verbatim unveiled the world’s first colour- tuneable and dimmable OLED module that


Figure 5 The LivingShapes Interactive Wall on the Philips stand.


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