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DETAILS [spotlight]


LONG LIVE THE KING Covering the vast Western Concourse, and spanning the full 150m length of London’s King’s Cross station, a new 20m-high ta- pered central ‘funnel’, made of a lattice- work of steel and glass, was unveiled ahead of its March 19th public opening. The architects of the new extension, John McAslan and Partners, worked with Network Rail on the £500m project to create the largest single span structure in Europe, de- livering a new station concourse with more than three times the space of its predeces- sor.


Network Rail brought in Unspun to produce the launch of the spectacular new exten- sion. Unspun’s creative team, consisting of Robert Alge as Creative/Executive Director, Glyn Peregrine as Lighting Designer and Julian Scott as the soundtrack composer, designed a show to highlight the dynamic meeting of the station’s original 1852 brick façade with the striking new curved steel


lattice. Peregrine worked with Dom Sheerman at PRG, pre-programming the show at their facilities in East Molesey, South West Lon- don. PRG’s Chris Burnage built a 3D model of the new station extension allowing Glyn and programmer Jim Beagley to design and program the show in WYSIWYG, presenting the concept to clients Unspun and Network Rail before reaching site.


Achieving the bold effects across such a large roof, Peregrine used a mixture of PRG’s proprietary Bad Boy Spot Luminaire, alongside Vari*Lite VL3000 Spots, VL3500 Washes and more traditional CS4 bars, to allow for sharp white beams to cut across the structure.


The zoom range of the Bad Boy allowed Peregrine to use the fixture both as a spot, creating beams at 7° zoom, ranging out to 56° to wash the roof with rich colours. The Quantum Colour system in the Bad Boy uses


individual colour filters to deliver a broad range of vibrant, saturated colours, without a reduction in brightness. Peregrine commented: ”PRG have looked after us every step of the way and delivered the highest level of service and equipment - the client is delighted.” Transforming the station, originally designed 160 years ago by Lewis Cubitt, has also been the catalyst for one of the largest regenera- tion schemes London has witnessed. The overhaul of King’s Cross has seen 67 acres of brown-field land redeveloped to create eight million square feet of offices, shops and new homes, as well as an art college. www.prg.com/uk


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