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LIGHT + BUILDING / LED REVIEW


Figure 7 The Verbatim VELVE colour tuneable OLED panels.


delivers a brightness of up to 2,000 cd/m2 .


The company’s latest series of Velve OLED modules are now twice as bright as earlier OLED devices. The Velve OLEDs are particularly suitable for creative use in stage lighting and novel applications in disco and bar environments, offering harmonious soft-light output, inte- grated calibration and an even distribution of light from panel-to-panel. Verbatim presented a new set of compact off-the-shelf modules and the company can create custom-made OLED panel sizes. One option measures 131mm x 44mm and the second is only 65mm x 72mm, a quarter of the original size. Both variants have a depth of only 5mm. The profile of the OLED mod- ules in this series has been made smaller, thinner and lighter because its printed circuit board is no longer rear-mounted and is housed in an electronic control unit con- nected via cabling.


Table 1 Road map White OLED performance from LG Chem.


The latest series of colour-tunable VELVE OLED modules (shown in figure 7) is ideal for mood lighting with each panel deliver- ing red, green and blue (RGB) mixed colour with illuminance of 2000 candelas per square metre at a colour temperature of 3000K. The latest colour changing OLED panel of- fers a very high colour consistency which is within a 2-step MacAdam ellipse offering excellent quality of light output with good CRI as shown in table 1. In just two years, Toshiba, one of the lead- ing electronics manufacturers has success- fully introduced its LED lighting products and solutions in Europe. Today, as a key actor, the lighting division continues to be a major innovative leader in introducing new ultra-efficient LED products and light- ing technologies. It was interesting to see Toshiba’s approach to lighting given their background and they demonstrated many


OLEDs on their stand as they believe OLEDs offer the next potential light source for general lighting and will equal LED per- formance by 2020 as shown by the slide in figure 8. OLED applications included bracket, shelf light, suspension and desk lights on their stand as shown in figure 9. Tridonic also launched three new OLED modules. The Luceos ROP series is ideal for decorative lighting applications and offers enormous flexibility. Products in the series can meet a wide range of require- ments, from elegant table lights and accent lighting integrated into walls to wide-area effect lighting. This is because the optics, mechanics and electronics are all perfectly matched to one another. This integrated OLED module is available in hexagonal and round versions. The integrated driver elec- tronics provides for simple and flexible inte- gration in numerous lighting applications.


Figure 8 Toshiba’s prediction shows OLEDs will be more cost effective than LEDs by 2019.


Figure 9 Toshiba’s OLED suspension light.


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