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LIGHT + BUILDING / LED REVIEW


Table 3 The new Intermatix ChromaLit XT performance characteristics.


high, these lamps had the drawbacks of short life and poor efficacy. The XLM 3000 Artist combines high flux with high colour rendering and is suitable for track, recessed downlight and wall wash luminaires. As with the rest of the Artist Series Range, colour rendering is accurate across all 15 CIE standard test colours, both pastel and saturated, including the deep red and skin tone references. Ra = 90+ and 95 typical, outperforming other LED solutions, as well as compact fluorescent and compact metal halide sources. XLM Artist Series is available in correlated colour temperatures of 3000K, 3500K and 4000K. As with all Xicato’s LED modules, the XLM 3000 Artist is colour consistent initially (1 x 2 SDCM) and over life and maintains its light level over time (L70/B50/50,000hrs). Xicato’s new “point” module, shown in figure 18, addresses one of the last bastions of halogen accent lighting - extremely tight beams, with very high luminous intensi- ties (such as from AR111 lamps). With an aperture of only 6mm, the new high-lumi- nance XPM enables reflector designs with peak intensities from 7,000cd to 50,000cd, and beam angles of 10° to 3.5° as shown in figure 19. Achieving this specification with Corrected Cold Phosphor Technology for tight initial


Figure 21 Panasonic’s novel LED lamp.


and maintained colour maintenance is an industry first. The new XPM is offered in both 2700K and 3000K Correlated Colour Temperatures (CCT). CRI (Ra) is 80 minimum as is CQS (Colour Quality Scale). Keeping up with remote phosphor type solutions, Intematix launched a new remote phosphor called ChromaLit XT that provides an advanced optical coating that makes the phosphor appear more natural in colour. ChromaLit uses a phosphor composite substrate separated from the blue LEDs. Improving on the conventional approach where phosphor coats the blue LEDs direct- ly, ChromaLit offers glare-free, diffuse light, high colour rendering and consistent light quality. By only using a blue LED engine instead of binned white LEDs, production is streamlined and inventories are reduced. Furthermore, system efficacy is increased up to 30%, reducing lighting system mate- rial cost and power consumption. ChromaLit XT offers a powerful and elegant solution for new applications like spot- lights and floods, extending ChromaLit technology’s light quality and adding higher light intensity, 65% lower cost per lumen and enhanced off-state neutral colour when compared to conventional remote phos- phors that are yellow in colour. ChromaLit XT is optically treated to maintain an off-state neutral appearance in order to look as good off as it does on – perfect for lighting designers. The added design freedom of ChromaLit XT means users can let exposed lights like pendant lamps and downlights integrate with the rest of the space without sacrificing high performance. In highly visual environments like restaurants and hotels, ChromaLit XT allows fixtures to complement the design flow. ChromaLit XT is available in Round, Linear and Square options and table 3 highlights its performance characteristics. Interestingly if you took the Bridgelux/Toshiba results for Blue at 0.614W of optical power (or Wrad)


Figure 20 Toshiba demonstrates Laser lighting concepts.


then you could get efficacies of 124lm/W at 3000K or 171lm/W at 4000K at significantly less costs. It will be interesting to see how remote phosphor solutions come into play as GaN on Silicon solutions come into the market place. Of course there was also a range of Zhaga modules available from a wide variety of customers - most notably Philips, Bridgelux, Cree and GE.


And finally, true innovation My prize for the most impressive lighting technology on show at Light + Building was shared between the two Japanese con- sumer electronics companies of Toshiba and Panasonic. I have picked Toshiba because it thought beyond LEDs and picked lasers as the way to provide innovative lighting and demonstrated a concept shown in figure 20 which used a blue solid-state laser to power a series of LED lights that used remote phosphors combined with fibre optics. The solution was elegant and obviously provides an interesting combination of fibre optic lighting without the problems associated with this technology such as poor efficiency and lamp life. There are many advantages of using lasers but one is the ability to get significantly high light power densities as it can be achieved from very small points of light. A second advantage is you could change the shape of the light source from a bulb to a candle and as there was no power required at the light source it was simple to unplug one lamp and put a different one in place. The second innovation was Panasonic’s “Nostalgic Clear” LED Lamp replacement bulb. The lamp delivers the same clear light as a 40W incandescent light bulb due to Panasonic’s unique light diffusion and heat radiation technologies as shown in figure 21. In addition, it boasts an energy saving of approximately 84 percent compared to a 40W incandescent light bulb and has a lifes- pan of approximately 40,000 hours, which is approximately 40 times longer than that of


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