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Opposite and above ATRIUM - As can be seen by the rendering above, SVA’s concept was based on colour temperature varying from 4000K cool white on the lower levels to warmer white at higher levels, e.g. banqueting, which links the narrative of the building and the visitor route but also reflects the lighting levels on the ship. The cavernous Atrium has a Feature Wall as its focal point. The lighting consists of Mike Stoane Surf Type X spotlights under DMX control. The central motif was lit with an ETC Source 4 Projector, as was the wooden panelled walls. Additional atrium spotlights were supplied by Precision Lighting Evo 20 spotlights.


Right top to bottom BOOMTOWN BELFAST - Large audio visual projections were the main source of ambient light. In addition, track-mounted Toucan 2 spotlights from Light Projects with AR111 narrow beam lamps (4 and 8 degree) were introduced to highlight newspaper stands. THE LAUNCH - Intelligent glazing switches between views of the slipways as they were in 1911 and today’s view. BENEATH - Split over three levels, the ocean depth is emphasised by providing various hues of blue and green light with layered water effects at high level. ETC Vivid Ice fixtures with a palette of blue and green LEDs mix and crossfade to provide a wash to the perimeter walls. They are supported by Mike Stoane Lighting Surf Type N spotlights at high level. A number of Rosco X24 projectors provide water ripples and movement along the top edge of the auditorium. acdc Ultra linear LEDs are used under seating to provide ambient light for those entering and exiting. BASEMENT - In order to entice visitors up into the main atrium, cold cathode by AM Light was incorporated within the canopy structures with frosted polycarbonate holes cut-out to produce a flat light. Additional Evo 20 LED spotlights from Precision Lighting highlight wall graphics. MYTHS & LEGENDS - acdc Ultra linear modules are located under the AV interactive display. Light Projects Toucan 2 track mounted spotlights highlight surrounding graphics and the Harland & Wolff gantry structure.


The story of Titanic Belfast is almost as epic as the tale of RMS Titanic itself. Having been unsuccessful in its bid for National Lottery Funding, Concept Design Architects CivicArts / Eric R. Kuhne & Associates’ landmark scheme for redeveloping the his- toric shipyards has stayed resolutely afloat thanks to the steadfast enthusiasm of devel- opers and regional government. Belfast City Council underlined local con- fidence in the regenerative powers of the Titanic Signature Project (as it was first known) in late 2008, with their unanimous vote to grant the scheme planning consent. On the 27th November 2008, First Minister Peter Robinson announced that the North- ern Ireland Government had approved a £43.5 million funding package towards the £97 million development, to which the City Council added its own £10 million contribu- tion. With Todd Architects acting as lead consul- tants, developers Harcourt Construction began work in 2009 with the stated aim of opening the main attraction in time for the centenary of Titanic’s maiden voyage in April 2012. Predicted to attract up to 400,000 visitors each year, Titanic Belfast is firmly on course to become the principal leisure catalyst for the city’s new Titanic Quarter.


The building’s form conjures up a mass of maritime metaphors; its four project- ing segments are instantly evocative of ships’ prows ploughing their way through the North Atlantic swell. Almost the entire façade is clad in faceted, three-dimensional plates in a pattern recalling of the construc- tion methods of the great ocean liners. Internally, the project provides over 12,000 sqm of floor space across five levels whose combined height is equivalent to a ten-sto- rey building. These generous ceiling heights allow for suitably large-scale exhibits, the lower levels being controlled environments in which to create atmospheric installations evocative of heavy industry or the depths of a ship’s hull. This ‘Titanic Experience’ is designed by exhibition designers, Event, whose previous work includes the award- winning Magna Science Adventure Centre in Rotherham and Imperial War Museum North in Manchester. CivicArts worked closely with Event to develop internal layouts and circulation patterns that would maximise the available exhibition space, dividing it into a logical sequence of ‘episodes’ within Titanic’s story. CivicArts’ concept design for the lofty central atrium deliberately evokes the towering forms and jagged, jostling angles of an early 20th century shipyard, creating a dynamic introduction to Event’s displays. Sutton Vane Associates (SVA) was commis-


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