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WHAT’S NEW MAYOR’S MESSAGE


You can learn to grow a row of veggies for your family . . . and food pantries too!


Parents have many obligations to their children: to keep them safe, to provide them with an education and to prepare them for their future, to name a few. But no responsibility is more pressing than to keep them fed. Sadly in Idaho, too many children aren’t getting the meals they need to grow healthy and strong. In fact, hunger is increasing in our community. In Idaho, one in six residents is food insecure, and 95,150 of those residents are children. While many food pantries are working hard to combat this issue, many families still don’t have sufficient access to fresh fruits and vegetables. To help combat this serious problem, the City of Boise and its partners have embarked on a new effort aimed at giving families the tools they need to provide healthy produce for themselves and others. Grow a Row, a program launched by Let’s Move Boise and the Boise Urban Garden School (BUGS), seeks to make more fresh produce available by helping residents learn to garden and encourage them to distribute fresh fruits and vegetables to local food pantries. All Grow a Row participants receive a packets of tools including seeds, how-to information, access to local gardening classes and a distribution list for local food pantries and community centers in their area. For more information on the program, or to get involved, visit LetsMoveBoise.com. Grow a Row partners also include the Idaho Botanical Garden, Idaho Foodbank’s Idaho Community Gardens program, Global Gardens, University of Idaho Ada County Extension


office and Boise Parks & Recreation with support from the Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health. Let’s Move Boise is part of First Lady


Michelle Obama’s initiative to address the problem of childhood obesity in our nation. The four pillars of Let’s Move are to reduce childhood obesity, make healthy food more accessible, provide healthy food in schools, and increase physical activity. The Grow a Row program is a perfect addition to the Let’s Move Boise effort and another important resource for parents to help their children grow strong. They deserve nothing less. Until next time…


David H. Bieter Mayor


WHAT’S NEW AT BOISE PARKS & RECREATION Paddle on at the River Recreation Park


A new water feature is generating a lot of excitement from boaters anxious to test out the Obermeyer Waveshaper at the new River Recreation Park, 3400 W. Pleasanton Ave. This spring, workers are expected to finish a new stretch of Greenbelt and a pedestrian overlook at the site. New seedlings and vegetation are being planted to stabilize the bank and improve the riparian area. A celebration of the park is being planned for June. To learn more, see www.cityofboise.org/parks.


SWIMBA Donates 8 Bikes for Camp Classes


Kids who sign up for mountain biking and cycling safety classes offered by Boise Parks & Recreation will have new wheels thanks to a donation of 8 bikes by the Southwest Idaho Mountain Biking Association (SWIMBA). The purchase was coordinated by Tomas Patek of World Cycle & XC Ski. The bikes replace aging equipment that was donated to the Boise Bicycle Project (BBP). Every year, about 250 youth participate in mountain bike programs offered by SWIMBA in partnership with Boise Parks & Recreation.


Show your support for Ridge to Rivers!


A new bumper sticker is available for $4.00 to recreationists interested in supporting trail improvements in the Ridge to Rivers system. The multi-colored stickers are on sale at local bike shops, outdoor stores and the Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road. Proceeds will benefit the management and construction of new trails in the 140-mile Ridge to Rivers system. For details, see www.ridgetorivers.org.


Greenbelt Gets Face Lift in Ann Morrison Park


It will be smooth sailing in Ann Morrison Park when a project to widened and repave the Greenbelt is complete in early summer. The pathway will be widened to 12 feet and paved with concrete. The


WWW.CITYOFBOISE.ORG/PARKS


$285,000 project is funded by the City of Boise. Two sections at the south Broadway underpass also will be repaired. Subscribe to our e-newsletter and you can get all the latest news about Greenbelt repairs. See the Greenbelt news page at www.cityofboise.org/parks.


Idaho Power Grant Funds 4 Ability Team Assemblies


More kids will enhance their awareness of people with disabilities thanks to a $1,000 Idaho Power grant awarded to AdVenture. The grant will help fund four Ability Team Assemblies provided free to schools throughout the area. For each assembly, Ability Team members in wheelchairs talk to students, demonstrate adapted sports equipment and challenge teachers to a wheelchair basketball game. AdVenture is a Boise Parks & Recreation program that provides social and recreational activities for children and adults with disabilities.


Paji Gets a New Pad at Zoo Boise


Zoo Boise is expanding and improving the exhibit for Paji, a female sloth bear. The current exhibit was originally constructed in 1967. The plan calls for filling in the moat, use heavy landscaping to provide the sloth bear with a more natural environment, and use exhibit glass along the viewing areas. This will increase exhibit space and give visitors a much more thrilling experience with this incredible creature. Behind the scenes, the bear dens will be renovated in order to provide accommodations to eventually breed this endangered species. Funding is provided by $545,000 raised privately by the Friends of Zoo Boise. For more information, see www.zooboise.org or call (208) 384-4125.


SUMMER 2012 3


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