This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PERMANENT WAY SOLUTIONS


Above: The Mission Room ‘cube’ seen from above.


Grant said they’d certainly seen the benefi ts and Denby added: “It is all about the immersive nature of the experience: being able to understand how something to the left of you relates to something to the right or behind you is one of the key elements Mission Room gives you.


“Its very visual nature means it, as far as we are concerned, is the next best thing to standing on the real site, and you get the benefi t of not having to travel, and the cost and logistics benefi ts of that. You can do it as you want.”


Safety is another key factor: it allows something to be inspected without putting people at risk any more than necessary.


Grant said the system is also of real benefi t to planners; instead of constant site visits and walk-throughs, they will use the Mission Room.


“So they’d be able to travel through areas where we’ve got footage and they can go through their plans to re-emphasise what they thought was there or double-check certain logistic parameters.


“We’ve used it in incident investigation as well; to go ‘back in time’ to have a look at the state of a piece of infrastructure, using previous footage, to be certain it was how we thought it was.”


Stuart added: “Being able to view and inspect the infrastructure from the safety of the site offi ce has been a key benefi t for us. By removing the need for physical site surveys we have been able to reduce the risk of people working in close proximity of the operational railway. Having safe virtual access at the touch of a button has also allowed us to go back and double check the smallest details without the time and cost implications of re-visiting the actual work site.”


Denby said: “If everybody understands and everybody has the same mental picture of what is going to happen when they go out on site, and the planners have gone through and


46 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12


planned where the materials are going to go and the access points, and so on, then it should logically make the operation better, more effi cient, and mean fewer mistakes. Mistakes are very costly in the rail sector.”


The footage also means there is less chance of confl ict at the end of a project because there is visual and time-stamped evidence to refer to at all points.


It can also help with stakeholder engagement: for example, on the F2A project, First Capital Connect staff were given a better insight into the works that were to take place using the Mission Room, and there are potential future uses during planning consultations too.


Lights, camera, action


Asked how often the team actually has the camera out on site, recording new footage, Grant said: “There has been a lot of activity to get through, to get footage of all the locations; all the site access points and all the stations, for example. That’s involved travelling through the infrastructure, up and down the three-mile stretch of line, just to ensure we get all the base footage. Now it is more strategic footage being picked up; when we know, say, that in 12-16 weeks time we are going to be moving to a new area of the worksite.”


Denby added: “That’s a key lesson that is being learnt. The technology was introduced right at the start of this project, but in an ideal world it probably should have been introduced a little bit earlier to enable that background data to be picked up earlier. That way you can hit the deck running; I think there was a little bit of catch- up here simply because the technology is new, it wasn’t available and the project was only made aware of it quite late on in the planning cycle. Ideally, you’d probably be using Mission Room six months to a year before the project is going into its operational phase – using it as a planning tool.”


The technology – shortlisted in the ‘safety’ category at the recent Network Rail Partnership


Awards – is likely to be seen on other rail projects soon, Denby said. It can also be used in other ways, on a lesser scale than the full 360-degree ‘Arena’ experience – there is a ‘Mobile’ option, utilising a trailer containing similar facilities, or a more traditional screen- based approach using a wide, IMAX-like screen, for example.


Denby said: “We have given a number of high- profi le demos to senior people within Network Rail, so we are hopeful. It takes time to establish a technology and people will be looking at Finsbury Park as a pilot project to see how it goes, but everything looks promising.”


The F2A project itself is about 30% complete, with many infrastructure upgrades having been done in the Finsbury Park area in time for the Olympics, including around half of the S&C renewals and associated signalling modifi cations, and around 30-40% of the civils works, such as bridge reconstruction.


Post-Games, the focus will shift more to the Alexandra Palace end of the site.


After two big possessions at the start of the works – a 54-hour possession at Christmas and another at New Year – the team have been working during 24-hour weekend possession windows.


From December this year, passengers will start seeing the benefi ts, when the platform extensions should be complete.


Grant explained: “The operational fl exibility has increased now, so we have crossovers installed that can give signalmen better fl exibility if something goes wrong. Perhaps the passenger wouldn’t notice that straight away, but certainly the benefi ts are starting to feed in now.”


FOR MORE INFORMATION


www.missionroom.com www.bbrail.co.uk/F2A


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156