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COMPANY NEWS


Crossrail’s Custom House and lifts contracts awarded


Contracts and appointments


• The DfT has awarded a £1.9m contract to design, develop, implement and manage a Rail Passenger Counts Database (RPCD) for 23 TOCs to Capita Symonds.


• East Midlands Trains has appointed Neil Micklethwaite as its new customer service & commercial director. He is a qualified accountant who joined British Rail as a graduate trainee 20 years ago.


Crossrail has awarded the main construction contract for Custom House station to Laing O’Rourke Construction Ltd.


The new station in east London is the only above ground station within Crossrail’s central section. The building will be built on the site of the former North London Line


station, which closed to passengers in 2006.


The station will include a new ticket hall, an interchange with the Docklands Light Railway and step-free access between the street and Crossrail platforms. Construction will begin in early 2013 and the contract is worth an estimated £35m.


Other bidders shortlisted were: Costain Limited; Geoffrey Osbourne Limited; and Hochtief UK Construction Limited and Hochtief Solutions AG JV.


Martin Buck, Crossrail’s


commercial director said: “The new Crossrail station at Custom House will not only assist with the continued regeneration of the Royal Docks but also improve links between central London and the ExCeL Exhibition Centre.


“When Crossrail opens, passengers will be able to reach Canary Wharf in 4 minutes, Bond Street in 17 minutes and Heathrow Airport in less than 45 minutes.”


In line with European


procurement rules, the contract is subject to a ten-day standstill period before it can be formally confirmed. It is Laing O’Rourke’s second big Crossrail contract win this summer: in June it won the C422 Tottenham Court Road Western Ticket Hall project.


Crossrail and TfL have also recently awarded a contract for the UK’s first incline lifts, at Farringdon and Liverpool Street Crossrail stations, and Greenford Tube station. They are being delivered under a wider £45m deal with Kone for 50 lifts for Crossrail stations and five lifts for three Tube stations, plus maintenance for 22 years.


Martin Rowark, Crossrail’s pro- curement director, said: “All Crossrail stations in central Lon- don will have step-free access from street to train. The new in- cline lifts offer an added benefit by allowing groups travel- ling together to have pas- sengers with wheelchairs, buggies or large bag- gage to take an incline lift while friends and family take an esca- lator directly alongside. These incline lifts will al- low Crossrail


to provide full step-free access at Farringdon and Liverpool Street stations where the platforms will sit below existing buildings, pre- venting the installation of tradi- tional vertical lifts.”


Miles Ashley, London’s Underground


programme


director of stations, said: “Greenford station will benefit from the first of the five incline lifts and represents an innovative approach in providing our customers with improved access. Incline lifts simply afford us with better opportunities to facilitate access where more traditional lift arrangements prove impossible to accommodate. Working jointly with Crossrail on this major lifts procurement has resulted in significantly better value for LU and TfL and will ensure that we increasingly deliver world class levels of reliability to our customers.”


• Global electrical test equipment firm Megger has acquired power cable fault location and pipe leakage detection company SebaKMT. • Interfleet Technology has made four new appointments: Steve Limbert as a technical director within the Electrification & Power team; Ian Shaw as a senior consultant and Andy Cobden as a consultant in the Built Environment team; and Tom Loades as a principal consultant in the Infrastructure Consulting team.


• Kent-based glass reinforced plastics company Dartford Composites has won a second contract with Eurotunnel. • Peter Hutchinson, finance director of Balfour Beatty’s rail division, has been appointed MD of Balfour Beatty Rail GmbH (Germany & Austria) based in Munich. His successor is Anoop Kang. • Mark Redwood has been confirmed as the new chairman of Achilles.


• Northamptonshire-based smart card company Novacroft has recently created 96 new jobs after winning new business. • Reading will be the first station in the UK to get HD TV quality IP-based surveillance, after Network Rail awarded certificates of acceptance to a range of cameras from Axis Communications. The full deployment should be complete by April 2013. • The DfT has given pilot funding of £16m for an innovation team, hosted by RSSB on behalf of the rail industry’s Technical Strategy Leadership Group, to be led by David Clarke. It will fund demonstration projects to test new technologies and business approaches, and help transform innovative concepts into tangible applications, products and processes rapidly and efficiently.


rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12 | 17


© Crossrail © Crossrail


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