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Full VoIP operation telecommunication for the railway industry


Zoë Mutch, marketing manager at Trans Data Management Ltd, examines the integrated communication and security solution required by today’s rail operators.


ailway and subway organisations are facing very challenging times in terms of the operational telephony evolution.


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For those working on the rail network and the passengers using it, an effi cient and reliable communication system is becoming increasingly important:


• The ever-greater demand for the transportation of people and goods has led to an increased volume of rail traffi c year by year. This makes an ever-more effi cient use of the railway infrastructure crucial, and in achieving this, optimal communication between all railway workers becomes indispensable. • Technical faults, cancelled trains, delays: when things become hectic on the station, passengers rely on receiving accurate and timely information to manage their itineraries.


For these reasons, train operators are confronted with a wide range of communications needs.


As well as the complexities presented by the specifi c requirements of a telecommunication system for the railway, public facilities traditionally use a variety of systems for different applications: surveillance, security, access control and information systems (help points, CIS, public address, etc.) In addition, multiple systems are usually distributed across geographically dispersed sites.


A satisfactory solution must integrate numerous existing and legacy systems that use various communication technologies: VoIP, GSM, GSM-R, ISDN etc, under one platform.


Trends dictate that there will be a continued growth in the demand, and an increase in the desirability of full VoIP integrated communication solutions.


This is prompted by three key drivers: economy- driven business stream-lining; environmental sustainability; and the increased use and expanding capabilities of IP. This is particularly true within the rail industry where any solution must offer a higher level of operational and managerial control with exceptionally effi cient monitoring and management tools. Trans Data Management (TDM) offers a solution that addresses the unique requirements of the rail environment, providing: future proofi ng via full IP; integration of multiple technologies; a single operator interface; smooth migration of legacy technology; end-to-end monitoring; and scalability.


A full VoIP system, TDM’s NIS Rail solution, integrates all the key elements of the railway’s communication tools including GSM-R, TETRA radio, CCTV, public address, customer information, emergency telephones and help points.


By using a meshed architecture of multiple communication nodes, several nodes can be networked via IP, making a system scalable in accordance with any growth or changes in requirements. The cluster technology guarantees a very high degree of availability, and the fully meshed networking with multi- node systems ensures that the overall system remains fully functional even in the event of a mains outage.


Thanks to the dynamic role and user management features, operators can log in on any system terminal. The routing is adapted automatically and user profi les uploaded accordingly, as a result, users are not tied to a specifi c workstation.


Additional features like standalone and fully redundant architectures, centralised confi guration and monitoring tools all contribute to investment protection and cost control.


Train operating companies in the UK, Switzerland and across Europe rely on TDM’s NIS Rail platform for the operation of station security and communication and the safe passage of the travelling public.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01293 516691 E: info@trans-data.ch W: www.trans-data.ch


VISIT


Come and see us at Hall: 4.1, Stand 224


100 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12


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