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SIGNALLING & COMMUNICATIONS


Next generation signalling control D


eltaRail’s IECC signalling control technology has taken a big step forward


with the launch of its next generation signalling control product – IECC Scalable.


DeltaRail has delivered the proven functionality of the Classic IECC on industry standard blade hardware and the LINUX operating system. A very important architecture change is the inclusion of IBM’s Websphere message broker technology, which enables much faster development of new features and easier integration with existing and next generation systems.


An important feature of IECC Scalable is the ability to interface with a wide range of interlockings (electronic or relay technology), and also the national IT systems that are used for timetable and maintenance planning. IECC’s strength has always been in enabling high railway traffic capacity from a large control centre. A key feature of the new product is that it is cost-effective for all scheme sizes.


Automatic Route Setting (ARS)


IECC Scalable provides an intelligent Automatic Route Setting (ARS) system that makes automatic signalling control decisions to assist


the signaller, even when traffic conditions are perturbed from the normal timetable. When there is major disruption to railway operations, signallers use ARS to: - Continue routing trains outside of the disrupted area, allowing attention to be focussed on the incident. - Assist in implementing contingency plans when there is a failure of trains or infrastructure. - Set special short-term timetables for additional trains.


IECC is still the only signalling control system that provides ARS as a standard feature for Network Rail applications. DeltaRail is currently under contract to deliver Enhanced ARS.


A new control architecture


The development of IECC Scalable has exploited a Service Oriented Architecture. At the heart of the system is IBM’s Websphere ‘message broker’, which links all of the software components through a common data hub. Messages containing information relevant to any number of the components are ‘published’ so that they can be received by those components that are ‘subscribed’ to receive them.


Below: IECC Screens at DeltaRail’s Derby Office and inset: DeltaRail’s New IECC Scalable System in Operation at Swindon B showing the interlockings behind the main cabinets


The Swindon B operation will be transferred to TVSC at Christmas 2012.


There are already seven IECC workstations controlling the Reading and Heathrow- Paddington areas, and it is planned that the centre will eventually control the whole of the Western route. Meanwhile, DeltaRail is working at TVSC to make progressive data updates to the existing IECC Classic systems to track the infrastructure changes being undertaken for the Reading re-modelling and Crossrail projects.


The company is also undertaking early GRIP stage studies for the additional workstations required at TVSC to recontrol the Slough, Swindon A, Oxford and Bristol PSB areas, and of the impact of electrification and ERTMS roll- out for control of the route.


Contracts are also let for IECC Scalable at Cambridge (to control the new modular signalling equipment being installed by Signalling Solutions Limited between Ely and Norwich), and Harrogate where a VDU workstation installed in the mechanical box will permit closure of adjacent boxes at Horsforth and Rigton.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01332 869800 E: customerservices@deltarail.com W: www.deltarail.com


124 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12


Lawrence Roberts, marketing manager at software and technology company DeltaRail, introduces the company’s new IECC Scalable signalling control product.


This is a particularly efficient way of operating a signalling control system since the various components (including workstations, ARS, timetable processing) are called into action only when triggered by external events, such as a train entering a new section of track.


Installation at Swindon B


IECC Scalable is going through an initial Network Rail product acceptance as a like-for- like equivalent of the existing system, where an IECC Classic has been in service since 1993. A new IECC Scalable has been installed alongside the IECC Classic and now controls high-speed passenger and freight trains around the busy junction at Didcot on the main route from London to Bristol, Cardiff and Oxford.


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