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TRAINING & STAFF DEVELOPMENT


Benefi cial training interventions


Craig King, managing director of TQ Catalis, discusses what it can offer as a training and assessment provider.


TQ


Catalis is a leading provider of high quality training and assessment solutions, focussing particularly on industries where safety is paramount, such as rail and power.


Our range of products for the rail industry is ever evolving and we offer high quality, dynamic training in all areas of railway engineering and safety, health and environmental subjects.


We don’t believe in a one-size-fi ts- all approach and as such spend time with our clients designing the most cost-effective and benefi cial training intervention based on their business needs.


As a one-stop provider we can cater for all of your learning and development from


needs, apprentice to chartered


professional, using a mix of learning styles and delivery patterns.


Our practically focused training events are delivered throughout the world and can be at one of our


three centres, Derby, London and, new for 2012, Corby. Alternatively we can deliver at your site as appropriate.


A selection of training areas we cover includes:


• Signal engineering, (design, installation skills, testing & maintenance)


• Railway communications systems


• Track engineering training (PWay skills from trainee to senior engineer)


• Electrical engineering (LV, HV switching & transmission, rail electrifi cation)


• Rail operations and rail vehicle engineering training


• Engineering apprenticeships • Safety, health & environmental training (approved by IOSH & NEBOSH)


• Control systems training (PLC and SCADA)


• Sentinel safety and rail plant competencies


• Leadership and management (ILM and CMI)


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 0845 880 8108 W: www.catalis.com


Preparing for major industry changes


Glen Kelly, manager of Renown Training, explains how the company is getting ready for the upcoming changes to rail training.


W


ith two major changes afoot in


the railway training


industry, Renown Training has been busy behind the scenes ensuring we are ready to deliver compliance to all our customers.


New competencies in PTS (DCCR) and Possession Support both go live on 1 September 2012 and Renown anticipates a last-minute rush from industry employers to ensure compliance in the transition of their staff. In preparation for this Renown Training has briefed all trainers and assessors and made extra places available on conversion courses for both disciplines.


PTS (DCCR) aims to extend the knowledge and understanding of individuals who are required to work in DC-electrifi ed areas with respect to the risks and precautions associated with conductor rail equipment. Individuals who currently hold PTS DC are required to undertake the new DCCR course between 1 September 2012 and 6 December 2014.


Possession Support is aimed at anyone who is currently (or required to in the future) undertake ‘block road man’ duties. From 1 September 2012 all individuals concerned will need to undertake either an assessment or initial training to carry out duties including placing protection for an engineering supervisors worksite or possession.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01785 764477 W: www.renowntraining.co.uk


rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12 | 43


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