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LIGHT RAIL


The Supertram in Sheffi eld – the new tram-trains in the pilot will run both on its network, and the heavy rail network to Rotherham.


“By connecting such routes to on-street networks, the extent of capacity used by urban services can be reduced, releasing capacity for higher value use, and in the longer term, potentially avoiding the need to provide additional capacity track and signalling.


“Where tram networks exist adjacent to rail routes, the potential also exists to segregate outer and inner-suburban services by transferring the latter to the tram route where frequency and connectivity can potentially be enhanced. Catering for the inner suburban market separately in this way enables faster


outer suburban journey times and reduces the size of rail fl eet required for such trains, which can include vehicles required for 20 minutes or less in each peak. Possible applications in the Centro area: Rowley Regis-Snow Hill- Shirley service operated separately from Kidderminster-Birmingham-Stratford service; Walsall-Birmingham all stations service (on- street from Duddeston area).”


Inskip concluded by saying that tram-train is a “fundamentally proven concept”, that it frees up capacity in cities, and is “ideally suited” to bridge the gap between urban rail services and


light rail systems, while making the best use of both.


He said: “The application of light rail technology, linking and connecting with existing heavy rail systems, can create bigger networks at reduced capital cost freeing up capacity at mainline stations.”


opinion@railtechnologymagazine.com Geoff Inskip


TELL US WHAT YOU THINK


rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12 | 133


© Pilgrim


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