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SIGNALLING & COMMUNICATIONS


Signalling for the


T


he iLS (Integrated Lightweight Signal) has been designed principally to reduce installation and lifetime costs associated with signalling assets.


future


The construction of the iLS incorporates all the elements of a signal structure into one configuration and is mainly GRP for the signal head and post with aluminium used for the base and connection enclosure that integrates the structure to the foundation.


Currently two mounting arrangements have been used.


The first application is the Modular Signalling Enclosure used on Signalling Solutions modular signalling project for Ely Thetford Norwich. The Enclosure base houses all the equipment which would normally be situated in a location case in addition to being the mounting unit for the signal and post. The second application for normal mainline applications is a trunnion base that is used to mount the signal post and head onto the foundation base.


Clive Porter of Unipart Dorman introduces the principles behind the iLS.


All electrical connections to the signal are via a series of plug couplers and the signals are factory tested to reduce on site testing and possession times.


The iLS signal base, post and head is considerably lighter than a conventional signal and its support structure and there is no need for ladders or similar. This greatly reduces signal weight so there is no need for a large foundation or any heavyweight specialised equipment to install it.


The light sources for the lightweight signal are similar in construction


to the existing ‘classic’ range of Dorman signals with several evolutionary improvements.


The signal aspects are designed with self-cleaning properties that reduce the necessity to clean the signals as previously dictated by maintenance cycles. This opens the possibility to leave the signal for approximately five years between visits. The design also reduces the chance of Phantom aspects being displayed. The signals are backwards compatible with existing interlocking systems (current proved) and low current versions (volt-free double cut contact proving) are available for the main aspects.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


To request a copy of the iLS brochure e-mail enquiries@ unipartrail.com quoting ‘Rail Technology Magazine – iLS brochure’. T: +44 (0) 1704 518000 W: www.unipartdorman.co.uk/ils


122 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12


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