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ROLLING STOCK


Record 125mph reached on Midland Main Line test run


An


East Midlands Trains Class 222 Meridian was run at record


speed on the Midland Main Line as part of a test to research the effects higher speeds would have on the track infrastructure.


Network Rail and East Midlands Trains operated the diesel train at 125mph on a short stretch between Bedford and Ampthill on Sunday, July 1.


Network Rail is working to increase speeds on the line from spring 2014 to reduce the journey time between Sheffield and London to under two hours.


Some improvements


to the track are due in December 2013, including closing certain foot crossings and changing the canting of the track, while electrification of the line in CP5 has since been announced in the HLOS.


Scientists from the University of Birmingham examined the


aerodynamic effects and pressure waves created when the train ran through the tunnel at Ampthill. This research will be used for other projects, including HS2. EMT also examined the effects on the driver’s view of the line and signals at high speed.


Network Rail’s route managing director Martin Frobisher said: “Work carried out on test runs like these won’t just be used on this stretch of railway but will be used in many future rail projects.”


David Horne, managing director for East Midlands Trains, said: “This trial is a small but important test which will eventually lead to faster journeys between Sheffield and London.


“This exercise will allow rail to retain its competitive edge over the car and help improve our customers’ experience.”


The environmentally friendly brake friction material EFi


Tony Prideaux, general manager of


(European


Friction Industries) says that toxic brake dust can be eliminated.


EFi E


or European Friction Industries as it is known,


is the UK’s leading independent friction material designer and manufacturer, located in Bristol. EFi is part of the Freeman Automotive group with an established worldwide distribution and supply network.


EFi has recently concluded a BIS joint project to develop an environmentally friendly brake friction material for the mass transit rail market. The resulting product, Ecobrake, eliminates toxic brake dust generated in the braking process and is produced using environmentally sustainable materials and processes.


Critical to the success of Ecobrake was the identification of a very real problem, toxic brake debris, which is generated at the very point of maximum human exposure at rail stations and transit stops.


In addition to this is the exposure risk


of airborne 140 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12 particles on


elevated transit systems. Was it possible to reduce the risks by removing synthetic resins and aramid fibres using environmentally sustainable materials that produce bio degradable brake debris and which are toxicologically safe? The answer is yes it was and the result is Ecobrake.


Many hours of testing have shown that not only is Ecobrake more environmentally friendly than any other transit disc brake pad in the market, it also has several other benefits which have been designed into the product.


Ecobrake is significantly more durable than any other product, effectively increasing service intervals and all this without loss of friction performance.


Ecobrake increases braking disc


operating life by dramatically reducing wear and eliminating surface crazing.


Of course it should go without saying that Ecobrake does not contain any copper or alternative yellow metals or other heavy metals.


FOR MORE INFORMATION E: tonyp@efiltd.co.uk


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