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SIGNALLING & COMMUNICATIONS


A busy programme of mainline


commissionings T


he last 12 months have been an exceptionally busy period for Invensys


Rail’s project delivery teams, with a number of high profi le mainline schemes across the UK having been successfully commissioned, beginning with Phase 1 of the Thameslink Key Output 1 (KO1) programme in September 2011.


Since then, amongst a wide range of smaller projects, the company has commissioned the Water Orton resignalling project (Phases 1 and 2), Phase 2 and 3 of Thameslink KO1, the Salisbury to Exeter resignalling programme, the fi nal phase of the Paisley Corridor Improvement programme and the Reading Southern Lines, and Leicester re-control schemes.


The key requirement of the Thameslink project is to deliver a state of the art, high volume, high capacity railway through the City of London – working within the constraints of Victorian infrastructure. Across three phases, Thameslink KO1 covered the resignalling of Kentish Town to Loughborough Junction, for which Invensys commissioned two WESTLOCK systems controlled via WESTCAD control centres.


The solutions developed by the KO1 project team (Network Rail, Invensys and the major civils contractors) revolved around some extremely novel designs, with the high-quality design work a feature of the programme. With over 200 signalling equivalent units and 13 large relocatable equipment buildings


William Wilson, vice president, commercial, at Invensys Rail, looks back at an intense period of project commissionings, including Thameslink, Water Orton and Salisbury to Exeter.


installed, testing and commissioning were carried out in a controlled manner, despite the fact that by the very nature of the project, testing times were squeezed. As a result of the work, a conventionally signalled railway now operates through the Thameslink core area, with a capacity of up to 20 trains per hour.


At the same time as the Thameslink commissioning and following a 98-hour possession, the second and fi nal phase of the Water Orton Corridor Resignalling Programme was also delivered, within possession constraints. The project saw the replacement and renewal of life-expired signalling equipment, enabling signifi cantly improved traffi c fl ows in and through the Water Orton area.


This was the largest of the two project commissionings, covering 273 track circuits, 103 signals, 58 point ends and four fringes, as well as an extension to the WESTLOCK system that was commissioned as part of Phase 1.


The Salisbury to Exeter resignalling programme saw the replacement of all life- expired mechanical signal boxes along the 90- mile route from Salisbury to Exmouth Junction with three solid state interlockings and a new push button panel to control the route from the Basingstoke Area Signalling Centre. The works also included the renewal and recontrol of three manually controlled barrier (MCB) level crossings to CCTV and the recontrol of a further existing MCB (CCTV). As part of a value engineering exercise carried out by the project team, lightweight VMS signals were also installed along the route, allowing considerable savings in installation time.


The multi-disciplinary programme was completed in a remarkably short period of just 11 months, with commissioning taking place across six consecutive weekends with three discrete phases, plus enabling works.


This was a particularly challenging scheme given the tight timescale, the geographical spread of the work and the technical challenge of interfacing the new signalling with the old. The fact that the programme was delivered on schedule was a tremendous achievement, with great credit going to the entire project team.


These projects were part of the most intense commissioning periods that Invensys has been through for many years. To have successfully delivered such a breadth and depth of projects is an extraordinary achievement and a great refl ection of the commitment, dedication, skill and expertise of everyone who played a part in the work.


FOR MORE INFORMATION www.invensysrail.com


rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 12 | 119


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