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CL AS S NO TE S


CREATIVE THOUGHT Looking out for the land


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efore entering Skidmore, Amy Foss ’02 was a skier and hiker and read about politics in


the newspaper. But her freshman political science courses inspired her first major, and after a sum- mer working for the US Department of the Interior, she designed a second major in environ- mental studies (not then a regular major, as it is today). “Political decisions are often connected to, and determine, how we interact with the natural envi- ronment,” she notes. “They can preserve, con- serve, or poten- tially de stroy it. I felt it was imper- ative to gain per - spec tives from both disciplines to un derstand the issues facing our en vi ron ment.” After gradua-


tion Foss joined the Southwest Conservation Corps, a non- profit modeled


after the Civil ian Con serva tion Corps of the 1930s. Based in Durango, Colo., SCC offers young people from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to develop skills and to help advance an ethic of nat- ural-resource stewardship. Beginning as a crew leader, she worked on


trail projects in remote locations—an effort she says drew more on the physical and mental strength she gained as a varsity rower than on her academic background. Now as director of opera- tions, she interacts with government officials whose agencies provide funding for SCC, so “un - derstanding the current political climate is im per - ative,” she says. She also gives direction to SCC’s experiential-learning program in environmental issues and public land management. She helped develop SCC’s Veterans Green Corps for current war veterans, she has worked with the Western Hardrock Water shed team, addressing the effects of mining, and she supervises the Ances tral Lands Office, which engages Native Americans in pre - ser vation projects. She says, “I feel incredibly lucky to have a job


where one day I could be in D.C. meeting with political supporters, and the next day I could be hiking into the mountains on the Continental Divide.” —MTS, SR


She says, “I love what I do, and I’m grate- ful for the Skidmore education that has allowed me to pursue my dreams.” JACQUELINE VERNARELLI 1909 N. OAK LANE STATE COLLEGE, PA 16803 JVERNARELLI@GMAIL.COM


’05


Class Participation 31% Legacy Society 0 / FOP Donors 9


Susan Parrill, UWW, is pursuing a PhD in philosophy at SUNY-Albany and will teach a course in logic in Skidmore’s philosophy department this spring. Lauren Mandel earned a master’s in


land scape architecture from UPenn. She is a project manager, rooftop agriculture spe- cialist, and designer at the green roof firm Roofscapes Inc. in Philadelphia. Christina McHugh married Mike Quagli - ana on September 24 in Saratoga Springs. Present were Max Ruby, Matt Rivers, and Jess Bergen ’08. The newlyweds live in Clifton Park, NY.


I (Kristen) work for the Sundance Film Festival and live in Park City, UT. I’m also a news editor for The Film Stage, a cinema- focused Web site. KRISTEN COATES KRISTENCOATES83@GMAIL.COM and JASON DEL POZZO 644 WICKENDEN STREET PROVIDENCE, RI 02903 JDELPOZ@GMAIL.COM


’06


Class Participation 31% Legacy Society 0 / FOP Donors 4


Liz Brier-Rosenfield gradu- ated from Ameri Corps and is pursuing a master’s in higher education admin- istration at NYU. Tiphony Dames com- pleted her certificate in human resources from Cornell Uni versity last summer. She works for Lock heed Martin and lives with her boyfriend of three years in eastern Washington. ALEXANDRA RAVENER 43 VALENTINE AVENUE GLEN COVE, NY 11542 A.RAVENER@GMAIL.COM


N JUNE 2–5 ’07 64


Class Participation 31% Legacy Society 0 / FOP Donors 11


In June Molly Lemire graduated from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology with an educational specialist degree in school psychology. She is an intervention coach in the Waukegan, IL, public schools. Alli Feigen and Taylor Leake had an


amazing time visiting Annie Gayner in Japan last spring. Alli was preparing to move to Philadelphia to attend grad school for museum education in the fall. James Woods Corwin attends Old Do - minion University in Norfolk, VA, pursu- ing a master’s in sports management. Eloise Denise Silston-Aska was named CEO of the Airport Authority in Antigua. She was formerly a senior air-traffic con- troller for the Antigua Ministry of Avia - tion, a position she held while completing her Skidmore business degree. For her sen- ior project, she authored a market analysis of St. Kitts as a viable option for invest- ment. In 2010 she earned an MBA in man- agement information systems from the University of the West In dies. She is also a counselor for Acteens of Antigua, a men- toring and leadership de velopment pro- gram for high school girls. She plans to pursue teaching online, believing that such opportunities “have made tertiary educa- tion truly democratic and ubiquitous.” MEREDITH FREED 15 DOGWOOD PARK NORTH DANBURY, CT 06811 FREED.MEREDITH@GMAIL.COM


’08


Class Participation 35% Legacy Society 0 / FOP Donors 12


Andy Cabell and wife Whitney happily live in Waterbury, CT. He teaches dance at an Arthur Murray Studio, and she is a nurse at Masonicare Heath Center. Chantelle Walker was promoted to sales coordinator at Penguin Group USA. She is completing a master’s in media studies at the New School. She plans to use the de - gree to focus on publication marketing and to create her own online magazine and news site. Rebecca Horton received a master’s de - gree from the United Nations University for Peace and is awaiting assignment. After completing a yearlong stint as a children’s Chinese teacher at the Capital Region Language Center in Ballston Spa, NY, Suxin Cheah volunteered for three months at Earth Embassy, a sustainable organic farm in Japan, where she woke up to Mt. Fuji every day and learned about eco-housing, sustainable business, and farming. She then traveled through major Chinese cities before returning to Singa - pore, where she is a full-time teaching associate at the Learning Lab, an education enrichment center. Suxin also volunteers as secretary for the United World Colleges’ Singapore National Committee, helping publicize the Davis UWC Scholarships and select the next group of scholars. Nancy Walker, UWW, released a CD


AT WORK


JERRY MCBRIDE


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