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CL AS S NO TE S ’91 ’92


Class Participation 29% Legacy Society 5 / FOP Donors 4


HEATHER SANTMIRE DENKMIRE 36 NOTT STREET, #101 SACO, ME 04072 HEATHER@GRANTWIN- NERS.NET


JUNE 2–5


Class Participation 29% Legacy Society 1 / FOP Donors 12


Shandele Gumucio and Oliver Davis are in Boulder, CO, with kids Olivia, 8, and Calder, 3. Shandele’s company Studiovert does branding and graphic design. Oliver runs Concept 3D, which uses 3D modeling to enhance clients’ Web sites. He’s also launching a map-based higher-education search tool called Egiate. This free resource locates and describes 4,800 colleges and universities using 3D mapping and mobile devices for prospective students around the globe.


In NYC Gaby Gold (Gabygold13@gmail .com) is a voiceover artist and writer. On June 26 she married Steve Anderson, gener- al manager at TGIFriday’s in Union Square. Gaby suggests you stop by and have some potato skins! Her recent voice over work includes TV/radio spots for Mc Donald’s, Sun Trust Bank, and Texas DOT. She was also the voice of the governor’s informa- tion campaign regarding NYC’s new voting pro cess, both on the radio and in the backs of taxis. Gaby produced a benefit for the Movement to End Child Sol dier ing, a cause in Uganda that her cousin founded at Stage Left Theatre. “Gab’s Mixed Bag” was a collection of songs and snippets of plays and musicals she has written. She recently wrote a reggae/hip-hop musical for young audiences called The GingerBronx Man and completed the BMI Musical Theatre Writing Workshop as a lyricist. Lieu Galvin Hazelwood works for the Federal Reserve’s board of governors. She and Tom have a son Jacob, 2. Daughter Kaitlin is enjoying kindergarten and (sometimes) her new brother. The family lives in Springfield, VA. Sean Fitzgerald lives in St Louis, MO, with wife Christine and children Royden, 10, and Tatum, 8. As a VP at Enterprise Holdings—owner of the Alamo, Enterprise, and National car-rental brands—Sean ne - gotiates airport contracts for the three ren - tal brands in North America and for Enter - prise in the UK and Ireland. He serves as executive VP on the board of the St. Louis Foodbank, and has enrolled in Leadership St. Louis, which helps civic leaders hone their skills. Christine works part-time for a


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political consulting company. Scott Simon is president of North Pointe Realty, a commercial real-estate develop- ment firm in Cleveland, OH. Children Noah, 10, and Teilah, 8, keep him smiling and on his toes. Between volunteering, boxing, yoga, work, and parenting, Scott does a lot of traveling. He hopes to get back to Saratoga soon. Matt Antell lives Los Angeles, CA. He


and David Hearn ’91 are nearing comple- tion on From the Shadows, a documentary about international parental child abduc- tion. Matt’s son Jett is in kindergarten. In July Jennifer Laviano Swan and hus-


band Chris took daughters Emmy, 4, and Marisa, 2, on their annual trip from Sher - man, CT, to Hilton Head, SC. Lav added another attorney and a disability specialist to her firm this year. She has enjoyed blog- ging about the rights of children with dis- abilities on SpecialEdJustice.com, which has won some awards and distinctions, including being featured in the ABA Jour - nal. Last fall Lav and Chris celebrated their 10th anniversary by taking a cruise with- out the kids.


Steve Shalansky is managing partner of


Tor-Shal Capital, a private real-estate lend- ing firm in Providence, RI. He and wife Emily have been married 13 years; he says daughters Julia, 9, and Mia, 7, are growing up fast. Armon Bar-Tur spent six months travel- ing the world with his wife and two kids. They visited Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Singapore, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, and France. They now live in Aix-en-Provence, France. Everyone is learn- ing the native language and culture, expe- riencing big change, and having lots of fun. Armon and family have a travel blog at bar-tur.com. Last summer Jennifer Kong Chan and husband Terry took weekend trips to Lake Placid, NY, and Rhode Island, and spent a day in Saratoga Springs for the Travers Stakes. They enjoy their new home in Mor - ris town, NJ. Jennifer works in financial sys- tems for Diversified Agency Services (a net- work of Omnicom), handling databases, developing management reports, and automating processes.


Kate Evenson Liddle, UWW, graduated as the VP of a steel company in New Jer - sey. Thanks to the “incredible boost” to her self-esteem from her Skidmore experi- ence, she was inspired to move into health care. She started her own dental products company, and has a patent on a special night guard. She also realized another life- long dream when she purchased Dora, a rescued horse she adores.


AT WORK It all ads up


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t was seeing a poster for My Own Private Idaho that set Christopher Ries ’88 on the path to heading up his own ad agency. An art major, he moved to NYC after graduation, worked odd jobs, and traveled. “I wasn’t sure what I intended to do with my life, but I knew I wanted it to be creative,” he says.


And then one


day he saw the poster. It prompt - ed him to head for Los Angeles, “to pur sue my dream of combining my love of movies and the desire to work creatively in a paying job.” He soon landed a gig as a production assistant at the design firm Wern - dorf As sociates. (In a twist of fate, he was men- tored by the art director who designed the afore- mentioned poster.) Over the next decade, Ries worked at various agencies, designing posters for Men in Black, Zorro, Harry Potter, and Troy. While working at Crew Creative in Hollywood, he became a creative director, overseeing ad campaigns for the Harry Potter movies, The Dark Knight, The Hangover, and Sherlock Holmes and winning the Hollywood Re - porter’s Key Art Awards for The Prestige and The Hangover. When Crew Creative folded in 2009, Ries and


some co-workers started their own agency, Works Advertising. With big-name clients like Warner Brothers, Universal Studios, Sony, Relativity Me - dia, HBO, FOX, and CBS, they create posters, ban- ners, billboards, bus sides, bus shelters, and more. His favorite project “hands down” has been the


Harry Potter series, he says. The cast and crew are “some of the most talented and dedicated in the industry. Plus it’s been fun watching the kids grow up (not to mention going to London for the shoots!).” Ries enjoys “being in the trenches with talent-


ed, driven creatives.” Working in “an exciting, if extremely competitive industry,” especially as a small business owner, is inspiring, he adds—as is seeing the fruits of his labor “lining the streets” on his drive to work. —MTS


WINTER 2011 SCOPE 59


CREATIVE THOUGHT


MARK CAMPOS


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