This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
student groups, a scavenger hunt, films, and a kids’ workshop making art out of the number 10.


Professor Emerita Phyllis Roth, who as dean of the faculty had played a major role in the Tang’s creation, stood halfway up the stairs surveying the fun with obvious pride. She noted that the museum had “surpassed our ambitions and hopes in just a few years” and was the perfect embodiment of the Porter presi- dency’s “crossroads” theme. Nearby, Ian Berry mused about the multiplying effect of each visit to the Tang—the connections made with art, between disciplines, and among people, that can so enrich a student’s perspective. “It is hard to believe that the Tang already has reached this milestone,” said President Philip Glotzbach in an all-campus memo last fall. “But, at the same time, it seems as if it has always been part of the fabric of the College.” Indeed, says Porter (who has played piano at a couple of the Tang’s exuberantly multidi- mensional events), “I like to talk about the Tang as ‘Skidmore made visible.’ Skidmore is always re-inventing itself. And what happens at the Tang? Something is always new.” Unflagging after 10 years, Berry and company are still testing and experimenting: “How can we push ourselves, use every space, change the way we envision events?” He points to this fall’s Paula Hayes exhibition, which hosted dinners and provoca- tive discussions that spun connections to environmental studies, local farms, and the slow food movement. One program invited participants to think about how farmers get food to the table and concluded with a work party in Skidmore’s student garden. Each exhibition, each event presents an opportunity—an im- perative—to avoid settling into traditional ways. “If you’re not outside of your comfort zone,” declares Weber, “you’re not working hard enough.” It’s obvious that everyone is working hard, and while they stretch those comfort zones, the core mis- sion is solid. “I like what we are doing,” says Weber, who keeps a checklist of steps needed to “do it even better.” Looking ahead, he and his colleagues know there are important up-and-coming artists to present, scholars to debate, new faculty and students to engage ... and so many more ideas to explore.


Living the mission


“What distinguishes the Tang nationally is our identity as a teaching museum that explores ideas through objects and exhibitions, working creatively with artists, with Skidmore faculty, students, and teachers, and with parents and kids,” says Dayton Director John Weber. “Our 10th-anniversary exhibitions are great examples of that”—including:


The Jewel Thief through February 27 Co-curators Ian Berry and artist Jessica Stockholder combine works by more than 60 artists with inno - vative arrangements to ex- plore new ways of experi- encing abstract art.


CHRIS MARTIN’S RECORD PAINTING IN OIL, ACRYLIC GEL, AND COLLAGE


Elevator Music 17—Peter Edwards: Specter through February 27 The Tang’s elevator presents strange melodies, pulsa t ing tones, and bright colors emitted by reactive orbs de- scending from the ceiling.


Opener 20—Paula Hayes: Understorythrough April 17 Paula Hayes ’87 transformed the Tang’s Payne Room into an immersive environment—part gallery, part lounge, part dining room—with trees in planters, hand-blown glass terrariums, custom wallpaper, and handmade tableware featured in a series of themed dinners.


Environment and Object • Recent African ArtFebruary 5–July 31 Co-curators Prof. Lisa Aronson and John Weber examine the broad impact of the environment on recent African art and the use of found objects and materials as artistic media.


Alumni Invitational 3 March 26–July 31 The Tang presents works by four alumni artists: sculptor and welder Johnny Swing ’84, painters Bradley Castellanos ’98 and Josh Dorman ’88, and photographer Shellburne Thurber ’71.


8. ASSISTANT KRISTEN CARBONE ’03, CHEMIST RAY GIGUERE, AND DIRECTOR JOHN WEBER PLAN THE MOLECULES SHOW. 9. JOACHIM SCHMID TALKS WITH STUDENTS ABOUT HIS PHOTOWORKS 1982–2007. 10. KIDS ENJOY HANDS-ON WORKSHOPS AND DISCUSSION, THANKS TO TANG EDUCATORS LIKE GINGER ERTZ (AT RIGHT).


10 8. 10. 9. WINTER 2011 SCOPE 17


ARTHUR EVANS


PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW JERSEY; PHOTO BY ARTHUR EVANS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72