This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
What would Lucy think?


Distinctively interdisciplinary, Skid- more’s freshman seminars are named for Lucy Skidmore Scribner in honor of her progressive, even pioneering approach in the early days of her school and col- lege. But the often topical, sometimes edgy subjects of the Scribner Seminars today would have boggled her mind. Take, for example:


• “Narcocultures,” with Spanish profes- sor Maria Lander


• “Visual Culture of Caffeine,” with art historian Mimi Hellman


• “Colonization of Space,” with astro- physicist Mary Odekon


• “Plagues and Humans,” with biologist Sylvia McDevitt


• “Afterlives,” with English professor Regina Janes


• “Popular Kabbalah,” with religion scholar Marla Segol


• “Shakespeare was Jewish?” with theater professor Lary Opitz


• “Welfare and Poli- tics,” with sociologist Pat Oles


• “Africa Through Its Changing Cinema,” with French and Maghreb scholar Hédi Jaouad


• “Leather, Paper, Lead,” with artist Kate Leavitt


• “Sex/Text,” with literary scholar Mason Stokes


• “Self and Desire,” with philosopher Reg Lilly


• “Latin American Image/ Reality,” with govern- ment professor Aldo Vacs


Worth the trip from anywhere!


Celebrate! 40 years


of Skidmore College


University Without Walls 1971–2011


May 21 • Buffet Reception following Commencement 2011


• Retrospective Exhibit at Scribner Library, mid-May through August


Join us in Saratoga Springs for


our fourth annual citywide celebration of the arts—music, dance, visual art, film, theatre, and literary art.


June 9-12, 2011 SaratogaArtsFest.org 10 SCOPE WINTER 2011


More details coming soon. Questions? Contact Mary Cogan at mcogan@skidmore.edu or 518-580-5458.


UWW will be closing in 2011


www.designsmithstudio.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72