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CL AS S NO TE S


years, and then became director of parent giving for Phillips Academy in Andover for five years. She now works for the non- profit Room to Read, which helps estab- lish girls’ scholarships, build schools and libraries, and educate teachers in develop- ing countries. It also publishes local-lan- guage books in nine countries. Wendy says, “In a nutshell, I have come full cir- cle, using all I was taught at Skidmore.” Wendy keeps in touch with Lesley Nor - man, Anne Eckardt Demas, who lives in Brooklyn, NY, Sue Sahlman-Stoffel, and Leslie Hotchkiss Arndt, whose daughter Sara Arndt ’14 is a Skidmore freshman. In October Kathy Melén Lawton headed back to Saratoga for Skidmore’s Celebration Weekend. She’d also been on campus in September to settle her son into Kimball Hall, and had fun sitting in the window seat and walking around campus. She says everything feels the same, with many im - provements and new buildings, including a dining hall that’s a far cry from our din- ing hall days!


Jocelyn Sandor Urban moved to Red - ding, CT, last year. Son Nicholas, a junior at the Hopkins School in New Haven, loves art, and Jocelyn is hoping he follows in her footsteps to Skidmore. She makes her living as an artist, specializing in cus- tom portraits of horses and dogs. You can see her artwork each year at the Hampton Classic Horse Show in Bridgehampton, NY. In October her portraits were shown in The Tame and the Wild at the Handwright Gallery in New Canaan, CT. She is also represented by Gallery at Four India on Nantucket. Husband Rick, an equine vet, practices in the Fairfield and Westchester area. Their equine and canine greeting- card business, Fursure Enterprises, is wind- ing down, but they still have cards left. The couple owns two retired thorough- breds and two adopted dogs. She has seen Wendy Florentine Parente at Hopkins, and Steven Cornell ’81 is her banker. She welcomes connecting with classmates on Facebook.


A brain tumor survivor, Sheila Killeen has been involved with the National Brain Tumor Society for over 15 years as a board member. In October the society sponsored a Brain Tumor Walk around Castle Island in Boston. There were 1,500 participants who raised more than $420,000 for re - search, patient services, and advocacy pro- grams. Sheila says, “I received contribu- tions from fellow Skiddies Barbara Quinn ’78, Debbie Monosson, and Janet Cone. Through the intercession of class president Jenny Charlesworth Thomas, Betsy Good enough created a fun logo for my


team shirts—The Runaway Brains. I thank them all for their support.” For the next Boston Brain Tumor Walk, on October 1, 2011, she hopes to build an even larger Skidmore team. Lisa Ochs Arnold misses son Rome, who is attending Andover. Martha VanGelder and husband John are back in Los Angeles, CA. I recently saw my old roommate, Maura Connelly, when she was in Boston for her 35th high school reunion. DEBBIE MONOSSON 16 PERRY STREET CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139-3912


If you missed our 30th reunion, start mak- ing plans to attend our mini-reunion, August 10–12, 2012. We hope to offer lunch in the “At the Rail” tent at Saratoga Race Course and then dinner at Saratoga National Golf Club. Rooms will be avail- able at the Northwoods Village Apart - ments on campus. Your suggestions and assistance are always welcome. For more information, please contact me at special- cat@msn.com. Kim Alger-Norton spent the summer working on her retirement dome house in Ithaca, NY. She also paddled on Cayuga Lake in her new sea kayak. Linda Cooke Ashley traveled to north- ern Italy with three friends last summer and enjoyed the beauty, art, architecture, food, and wine of Venice, Verona, Lake Como, and Cinque Terra. Now that she and her husband are empty-nesters, they plan to do some bareboating this year. Linda enrolled in an advanced sailing course at Boston Sailing Center and is sail- ing around Boston Harbor and the islands every week. She says it’s like sailing in Grand Central Station but good practice for close-quarters maneuvering! Vicky Morgan-Fickett is in her eighth year of teaching visual art to fifth- and sixth-graders at York (ME) Middle School and loves it. She spent the summer kayak- ing, gardening, and reuniting with daugh- ters Darian, 20, and Caitlin, 23. Vicky’s mother, Rheta Armbruster Morgan ’37, turned 95 in April and lives in Kennebunk. Vicky quotes Picasso: “Every child is an artist. The trick is how to stay an artist once you grow up.” Nancy Greene has lived in Short Hills, NJ, for 15 years. Son Sam is a freshman at Harvard. Daughter Michelle is a sopho- more at Millburn High School. Nancy works at her local arboretum and volun- teers for the high school and Girl Scouts.


’80


Class Participation 31% Legacy Society 9 / FOP Donors 18


After five years in Singapore, Brenda Fed - rizzi Korn returned to Connecticut in July. In Miami Lisa Kott Massirman had a busy summer. Daughter Jordan went to Camp Manitou in Ontario for a month, while son Drew played lacrosse, traveling to Delaware for competitions. The whole family went to Carmel, CA, for a month with Lisa’s parents in tow. Lisa and Jordan went to Paris for four days to celebrate the bar mitzvah of a close friend, and Lisa enjoyed a mother-daughter trip as well. George Lowther, his wife, and three chil- dren moved into the recently finished home they spent years designing. Their 16- year-old daughter is a sophomore at Taft. Their son and other daughter went tubing, played golf, and pursued other sports be - fore returning to third and eighth grade, respectively. George’s real estate business has begun to pick back up. He wishes class- mates “health and happiness.” Steve Morrow spent an interesting two weeks last summer after the Fox television network accepted his and his wife’s appli- cation to appear on Wife Swap. To Steve’s surprise, his wife enjoyed living with a pig farmer’s family in rural Arkansas. Both children and pigs were home-schooled! Steve says he and his kids learned a lot of interesting animal behavior. “Definitely a rip-snorting memory,” he concludes. Gina Lancaster-Salguero is spending the year with her 5-year-old grandson at his house while his father is in Kuwait with the army. She is having fun filling the space, as her youngest son is now a college freshman at Berklee in Boston. She is still caring for horses and teaching skiing. Jennifer Cox Torey and family started visiting colleges with son Dylan, a high school senior. He was recruited early by Quinnipiac University to play Division I lacrosse, so they had time for vacation, which they spent in Nantucket, the Ba - hamas, and their second home in Jupi ter, FL. Son Jason attends Sacred Heart Univer - sity and is a personal trainer. Hus band Don celebrated 30 years at General Elec tric. Jennifer plays tennis and golf, manages their homes, and travels with the family. She was sorry to miss Reunion, but her youngest was playing in the Connec ticut statewide lacrosse championship; his team won the title for the sixth year in a row. In September Marcie Siegel Shealy shared a fun night in NYC with Betsey Nelson Wilkie, Meredith Wagner, Debbie Genco Powell, and Missy Godfrey Fitz - patrick. A group photo from the evening is at skidmoreconnect.org; click on “class pages,” then select 1980. Many thanks to Pamela Richardson


WINTER 2011 SCOPE 55


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