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16.2.6 For vessels engaged on voyages outside the United Kingdom continental shelf or between two ports, one of which is outside the United Kingdom continental shelf, the ‘Operator’ of the vessel has the obligation to contact the port of arrival and /or departure Administration prior to arrival to agree that this Code standard for the carriage of dangerous goods is acceptable to them, including the additional constraints implicit and mitigating the MASS operation risk assurance assessment.


16.3 Cargo demarcation


16.3.1 The carriage of cargoes is the process whereby a vessel is loaded, or intended to be loaded, with any item for delivery to, or collection from, one location and loading/unloading at another location.


16.3.2 Cargoes can be divided into:


n General cargo – securing and other carriage requirements are Regulated through the Merchant Shipping (Carriage of Cargoes) Regulations 1999 (Statutory Instrument 1999 No. 336).


n Dangerous goods – cargoes which are classified as dangerous goods according to the criteria given in the IMDG Code are regulated through the Merchant Shipping (Dangerous Goods and Marine Pollutants) Regulations 1997 (SI 1997 No. 2367). Dangerous goods are assigned, and identified by, United Nations (UN) Numbers and Proper Shipping Names according to their hazard classification. Their system of containment systems, e.g. portable tanks, IBCs, drums etc must comply with the requirements of the IMDG Code with a minimum of equivalence to achieve operating certification of MASS.


n Clear warnings that a MASS vessel is carrying ‘Dangerous goods’ must be displayed in all appropriate spaces where personnel may board the vessel in any eventuality, and during normal ops i.e. safety checks, loading and unloading, maintenance etc.


16.3.3 Vessels where bulk cargo is loaded into and carried in the vessels hold or tanks which are considered to be small tankers or bulk carriers should be certified in accordance with the provisions of equivalent standards, recognising the MASS definitions and operational employment constraints thereto.


16.4 Ships’ stores 16.4.1 The IMO definition of ships’ stores (MSC.1/Circ.1216) is as follows:


n Ships’ stores, for the purposes of the carriage of dangerous goods, means materials which are on board a ship for the upkeep, maintenance, safety, operation or navigation of the ship (except for fuel and compressed air used for the ship’s primary propulsion machinery or fixed auxiliary equipment) or for the safety or comfort of the ship’s crew or workers in the event of partial manned operations;


n Materials intended for use in commercial operations by a ship are not considered as ships’ stores, such as: diving, surveying and salvage operations.


16.4.2 For the purpose of this Code, when a total quantity of 25kg/25litres of the following dangerous goods are carried and used on board a ‘light’ category of MASS, of Classes 2.1, 2.2, 3, 6.1, 8 and 9, such materials can be considered as ships’ stores and the vessel does not require a dangerous goods document of compliance. These materials can be specialist equipment to support the function of the vessel, in order to facilitate the specific tasks for which they are designed. Examples of such materials/specialist equipment would be compressed air bottles, portable generators/compressors etc.


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Being a Responsible Industry: An Industry Code of Practice


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