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n MASS Launch and Recovery System: – Launch and recovery of the MASS may involve the operation of a davit, crane or similar device. During these events, the davit/crane operator will have control of the MASS for a period of time;


n MASS start-up / shut down and transfer of control between the BCS operator and lifting device operator needs to be coordinated:


– External support, e.g. chase boats, port/harbour control, with the responsibility of controlling other vessels within the operational waterspace.


9.7 Controlling MASS from a BCS


9.7.1 The BCS should enable the operator to effectively monitor the behaviour of the MASS at all times, with a sufficient level of data to assess and react to requests including the following examples:


n Health Status of MASS, including warnings and alerts: – Built in Test Equipment (BITE) data presented to BCS; – Battery status; – Fuel level; – Engine or equipment condition and performance warnings; – Fire on-board.


n MASS navigational data: – Actual position, Heading, CoG, SoG; – Planned course.


n MASS requests: – Request to perform some form of action that requires BCS authorisation.


n Situational Awareness data within vicinity of MASS; For example: – Target/obstacle Track Data; – Camera data; – Radar data; – In water sensor data (e.g. obstacle avoidance sonar); – Sound data (e.g. warnings from other vessels).


n Collision Avoidance: –Warnings of potential obstacles. – MASS intended action (autonomy level dependent)


n Attack or interference with the MASS or its subsystems. n Chart overlays, including land mass, shipping lanes, charted obstacles, seabed topography (if required).


9.7.2 When designing the BCS, the type and quality of data presented at the BCS should be assessed to ensure that a sufficient level of safety and incident management is provided. This will depend on several factors; for example:


n Type of MASS: – Small MASS will be limited in their ability to support situational awareness and collision avoidance sensors. n Operation: –What other measures are available, if any, to provide situational awareness and communication with other vessels? –Where is the MASS operating, e.g. confined waters with high density traffic or blue waters? n Level of control available (see definitions in Chapter 2): – Data latency and ageing; – Reliability of Communications Link; –Weather; – Geographic location.


Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships up to and including 24 metres in length 45


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