search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
9.8 Relationship between autonomy level and BCS


9.8.1 There are several levels of control defined in Chapter 2. Irrespective of the LoC, the BCS should be designed to enable the operator to take control of the MASS at any time, including the ability to change the level of control or shut down the MASS completely.


9.9 Suggested BCS Operational Requirements 9.9.1 The following operational requirements are provided as illustrations for guidance:


n The BCS should enable the operator to plan the MASS mission; n The BCS should enable the operator to execute a MASS mission; n The BCS should enable the operator to evaluate the MASS mission; n The BCS should provide the operator with a sufficient level of situational awareness information both for the safe navigation and control of the MASS;


n The BCS should provide the ability for the operator to re-programme the required activities and responses of the MASS in timescales appropriate to the MASSs configuration, location and shipping conditions;


n The BCS should enable the operator to take direct control of the MASS at any time: n In cases where the BCS is unable to assert direct control of the MASS, e.g. when MASS is operating in Level of Control 5, special provisions and control measures should be required to ensure safe operation.


n The BCS should alert the operator of any emergency warnings or a change in condition such as risk of collision, fire on board MASS, MASS equipment or functional failure/defect or 3rd party attack/interference;


n The BCS should alert the operator of any changes to the planned mission, such as change in speed, heading, collision avoidance manoeuvres;


n The BCS should be arranged such that the transfer of control from one base station to another or from one MASS to another may be undertaken safely;


n The BCS should be compatible with the communications link; n The BCS should store data: n This could include log data for fault diagnosis, scenario reconstruction, (e.g. collision event), last known coor- dinates following communications loss etc;


n Sufficient to meet international/local regulations; n Two or more BCSs could be used to control one MASS from different locations. Only one BCS should provide control at any one time. Transfer of control from one BCS to another should be a simple seamless transition;


n Only one BCS will exercise control of a MASS at any given time; n The BCS should clearly indicate the control status of the BCS and any other BCS that forms part of a networked control;


n The BCS should provide a sufficient level of security to prevent unauthorised access. This may include separate account access levels for Operator, Maintainer and Supervisor purposes;


n The BCS should be easy to use. The type of information displayed should be based on the priority of importance. Safety related warnings, graphical or audible, should be displayed on the Graphical User Interface (GUI), regardless of the GUI configuration.


46


Being a Responsible Industry: An Industry Code of Practice


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84