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3.2 Standards


3.2.1 This Code provides standards which may be appropriate for operators to select to use for the various categories of MASS envisaged. The Code is based on an approach to which appropriate standards can be applied, noting that many of the existing Instruments and Regulations are derived from the SOLAS Regulations, which, for some unmanned surface vessels, may not be appropriate.


3.2.2 Ultra-Light MASS, as defined above, which are not used for financial gain or reward do not have to comply with the requirements for registration, or certification. This comparative freedom from regulation is in part based on an assumption that the sector will, as a matter of self-discipline and shared safety responsibility, pay proper regard to safety matters.


3.2.3 If an unmanned surface vessel is not a “pleasure or recreational MASS” it is considered to be used for reward for the purposes of this Code unless engaged on Government business.


3.2.4 It is the responsibility of the owner/managing agent to ensure that a MASS (and any associated control station) is properly maintained, examined and manned in accordance with the Code. The Code applies whether the owner/managing agent is corporate, private or of a charitable nature.


3.3 Certification


3.3.1 As per current national and international processes and practices, to be issued with a certificate for a particular area of operation, a MASS must comply with all the requirements of this Code for the relevant class of MASS and for the intended operating area where it is considered necessary, to the satisfaction of an appropriate RO. The requirement for, and issue of, certificates, will reflect the development of best practice and is included in this Code to demonstrate the clear intent of the Industry to show to the wider maritime community that unmanned vessels should not be exempt from established procedures wherever they are relevant and specifically where they will contribute to overall safety standards.


3.3.2 When issued to a MASS, a certificate should normally be valid for a period not exceeding five years. 3.4 Interpretation


3.4.1 Where a question of application of the Code or an interpretation of a part of the Code arises, the owner/managing agent of the MASS concerned should in the first instance seek clarification from the flag State authorised body or RO. In situations where it is not possible to resolve an issue of interpretation the Recognised Organisation may apply in writing to the Administration, who may consult with others as deemed appropriate.


3.5 Equivalent Standards


3.5.1 When the Code requires that a particular piece of equipment or machinery should be provided or carried in a craft or vessel, or that any particular provision should be made to a specified standard, consideration may be given to application to the Administration to permit any other piece of equipment or machinery to be provided or carried, or any other provision to be made. For vessels under 24 metres in length this is likely to be unnecessary. If an application is made, the Administrationwill need to be satisfied by trials or otherwise that the alternative is at least as effective as that stipulated within the Code.


18 Being a Responsible Industry: An Industry Code of Practice


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